https://www.duolingo.com/fozdel

After third language, started to slow second one

Guy, Turkish is my mother language and I have been learning English for 5 or 6 years and I was fluent in this language. However, after starting learning German, my fluency in English is getting slower. Is it normal or do you have kind of experiences ?

5 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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Not sure what you mean: if you mean that you learn more slowly, that is something that you'd expect anyways: initial progress is fast and than becomes slower. If you mean you English and your German seem to interfere with each other, that might also happen. Best thing to do is continue to practice both of them. After some time they will interfere less and less with each other

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fozdel

Yes, I meant the second one. When I try to speak English, I had to think "is it german or english" and continue but it really annoys me and slows me down while speaking English. I was very fluent in English but it really slows after I started to learn German.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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I experienced the same thing at first. Practice them both - at some point the languages will happily 'coexist' :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fozdel

That's a great news :) Thank you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nighteyes

It happens. I'm fluent in three languages for years now and still sometimes I get stuck searching for a specific word remembering it in one language but not the one I need. I think maybe because English and German words have big similarity it can be even more confusing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fozdel

Yeah, they are not only similar, even has different meanings like "will". Thank you for your answer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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"Will" still has a strong sense of the same word in german. You can say "it will happen because i will it to happen" - you will sound like a supervillain from a comic book, but it makes perfect sense. Imagine you are going to paint a fence. The modern sense of the word "I will paint this fence" probably arises from a sort of ingrained self assurance that anything one applies oneself to is almost certainly sure to happen; "I want to paint the fence, and I usually get what I want, so it is a forgone conclusion that it 'will' be painted.

Sorry if this post makes no sense, but i am always fascinated by the puzzle of how one word becomes another ... It is my will to enlighten :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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I have a similar sort of problem with Spanish and Portuguese. They are so similar from my point of view that I'll find myself wanting to use a word from the other one. But that is more to do with the fact that I don't speak either one well, I only know enough to read and understand simple conversation. However I can understand that this doesn't benefit native speakers in any way, since to my ears English and German could not possibly sound more different :)

English and German may have sprung from the same well, but have diverged too much over time to be mutually intelligible. English lives on loanwords, while German is stoically conservative. It is much easier to separate them if you focus on the accent. German has a very crisp and sharp sounding tone compared to English, which has much more emphasis on vowels, so when you are learning German words, make sure you are thinking of them in the strongest German accent you can imagine. It sounds silly, but it is a sort of subtle signature that helps you separate them.

Just don't worry about it though, I have an American friend that lives in Germany, who has told me that she sometimes struggles to remember the English word for something. She didn't forget how to speak English, it's just evidence that even fully grown native speakers are constantly refreshing their vocabulary. You do it every time you watch TV or read the paper :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fozdel

Thank you chilvence, that is a very informative answer. I think i need some time to seperate words faster while talking. I will take time and need practice..

5 years ago
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