1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Montag, Dienstag und Mittwoc…

"Montag, Dienstag und Mittwoch"

Translation:Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday

August 1, 2015

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauraAnimalgirl

Fun fact - the German word for Wednesday -Mittwoch- means 'middleweek' when literally translated. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/batgeek1121

I had been wondering about that, Danke schön


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClassiDuo

But it means a demotion for Odin/Woden--unlike the other weekdays (except Monday) which keep the Norse god connection. Wonder what happened...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin876054

I was wondering the same. Given the common roots of German and English, I wonder when this divergence of being Odin's namesake happened?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohamedAbd786473
  • Montag = Mond (moon)+ tag (day)= Monday
  • Dienstag: Diens (= duties) or (from verb "dienen = to serve)
  • Mittwoch = Mitte (middle) + woche (week) : middle of the weak
  • Freitag: frei (Free) + tag (day) -- Freitag: Friday
  • Sonntag = Sonn (Sun) + tag (day)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ktamkun

Your etymology of Dienstag and Freitag are incorrect.

Dienstag isn't Diensttag. It's probably from Proto-Germanic *þingsus dagaz, which would mean "day of Thingsus" (the Latin name of a Germanic god) according to Wiktionary.

Freitag, again according to Wiktionary, comes from Proto-Germanic *Frijjōz dagaz, "day of Frigg" (the Germanic goddess of the home).

Your other etymologies are more or less correct, but the words weren't formed from modern German words; they're much older. Montag and Sonntag are ultimately from Proto-Germanic, while Mittwoch originated in Old High German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danasmile11

What is the literal translation for Dienstag?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria786xx

It means Tuesday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vikram_1204

Good observation. Danke!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DallasEpperson

How common is the Oxford comma in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skeleclart

Not at all, there's never a comma before "und" and "oder".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ktamkun

The serial comma is extremely rare outside of English. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_comma#Other_languages


[deactivated user]

    Is there a historical reason why Germany doesn't have an 'Odin's Day' (Wednesday)? Although I do like the idea of calling it 'midweek'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

    In low german we still have the "Wunsdag" from Wodan -> Odin.

    In the 10th century christian missionaries changed the name of the day so that the memory of the 'old deities' could fade better. I don't get why they weren't interested in changing the names of the other days but maybe it's just because Odin was the main god.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ariel.j.bi

    There was one. It got changed somewhere in the middle ages, I believe.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharyOrta-

    Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RSySFn

    Lustig name fųr tagen.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tabbigsby

    I answered Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMuhammed

    Is there no Oxford comma in German at all, or is it just missing in the question?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HCDaria

    Does German have the same punctuation rules concerning the Oxford comma as English? Danke!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HZLzS

    correct answer given, but given as incorrect!

    Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.