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  5. "Elle marche jusque chez l'ho…

"Elle marche jusque chez l'homme."

Translation:She walks all the way to the man's home.

December 31, 2012

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivannam

The translation of chez as home is never good explained before. I interstage it is a kind of expression but still


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

As a complement, I would like to add that if you say "je vais chez le coiffeur" it means you are to get a hair cut at the hairdresser's shop, not at his home... And "chez" can also mean "among", example : "chez les animaux, l'instinct est puissant" (among animals, instinct is powerful). At last, if you hear or read "qu'est-ce qui ne va pas chez elle ?", it means "what's wrong with her?", which is a way to inquire about her mental state.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuFarge

Duolingo needs to put you on their payroll! Seriously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joel-Iowan

If they haven't they are doing it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magaly.o.c

I always asumed Siteaurf was from duolingo's staff until now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xuyang1233321

l quite agree with you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/datachomper

I agree with this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Homawahabi

I absolutely agree!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamLGRing

@Sitesurf is paid in lingots ;P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetraMia

Thank you. These kind of explanations is what I find most helpful and valuable on Duolingo. They help us to get the full perspective on language, and not just learning some specific phrases. And knowing them is also necessary if we actually want to translate texts that Duolingo gives us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gori16

Funny, in Russian they have something similar, i.e. Somebody is missing at her/his home (here "home" meaning her/his head) - У него/неё не все дома.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

Hope Russian would be available soon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phoener

"The lights are on, but nobody's home."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtacool

Duolingo needs to tell the entire list of meanings i mean really


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martinkunev

In my language (bulgarian) we have the word "у" which has exactly the same meaning as chez. Maybe the best translation in english would be "at ...'s place".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill-Roca

Thanks for that link


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minno726

The best direct translation I can think of for "chez" is "at the home of" or "the home of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hanxiongshi

can someone clarify the question why "all the way" is necessary? "all the way until" has quite a different connotation from "up to" since the former make "she" sounds much more engaged and willing to walk than "up to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeTschudi

I agree that there seems to be a difference in emphasis with and without "all the way"--with that clause, it sounds as if she braved rain, sleet, and snow to persevere. As another way to say it without the clause, how about "she walks just to the man's house": to the house but no farther.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khanabadoshmaj

Is there a difference here between jusque and jusqu'á? Would the latter change the meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Jusque is generally constructed with preposition "à" and means up to or until, ie both temporal and spacial notions:

  • J'attendrai jusqu'à son retour.

  • La réunion a duré jusqu'à huit heures.

  • Il le conduit jusqu'à la frontière.

  • Elle l'a raccompagné jusqu'à sa maison.

Note: if another preposition is used, "à" disappears: "jusque chez lui"

When "jusque" is followed by other adverbs: "alors, ici, où", it is elided:

  • Jusqu'alors, il était calme

  • La forêt s'étend jusqu'ici

  • Jusqu'où êtes-vous prêt à investir ?

  • Ma pelouse est tondue jusque-là (note the hyphen, like other words constructed with -là: celui-là, ce jour-là...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khanabadoshmaj

This is extremely helpful - thank you for taking the time to type it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuFarge

So, jusqu'a would mean she walks up to the man's house but doesn't enter? Am I overthinking? Or not thinking? rofl


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Yes, that is the meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eellrraatt

gratulations sinceres


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlackHeart01

is it necessary the expression "all the way" ?, i can also say "she walks to the man's house"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MakLearnsFrench

Why is "She walked up to the man's house" marked as incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sa_mills

Probably because it should be present tense, not past. 'She walks...' or "She is walking...'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerrill

Why is "She walks until she gets to the man's house" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Too many words in English, which would translate in: "elle marche jusqu'à ce qu'elle arrive chez l'homme"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerrill

Thanks so much. Your input is always so helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clive444

When do I use jusqu'a and when do I use jusque?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

All details are explained above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moosebouse

In English, "all the way" emphasizes the distance to the house. Is that what "jusque" does in this sentence? I would have thought "jusque" would mean something like, "right" or "exactly," as in "She walks right to the man's house," to emphasize directness or precision. And if not, "all the way" is entirely different from "up to" or "until," so is there a way to distinguish when "jusque" means one or the other?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"jusque" only indicates the direction of her steps.

There is no particular emphasis on whether the journey is long or not.

And it does not mean that she will stop in front of the man's door, nor ring the bell, nor enter his house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alisaglem

in a previous example, there was something about chez elle. Is the reason for "l" before homme just so it sounds proper?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

l' stands for "le" = the man


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lechuza-chouette

I'm a native English speaker and would say "she walks as far as the man's". Not accepted, but D. won't allow me to report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto.Karl

Can somebody explain to me why "She walks until his place" is wrong? Otherwise, I've got a problem. Sorry if this is clutter, but I do want to learn from mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lechuza-chouette

We don’t use "until" to talk about distance. We use "as far as":

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/until


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindyKMH

Can anyone explain the difference between 'jusque' jusqu'a ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Jusque is generally constructed with preposition "à" and means up to or until, ie both temporal and spacial notions:

• J'attendrai jusqu'à son retour.

• La réunion a duré jusqu'à huit heures.

• Il le conduit jusqu'à la frontière.

• Elle l'a raccompagné jusqu'à sa maison

Note: if another preposition is used, "à" disappears: "jusque chez lui"

When "jusque" is followed by other adverbs: "alors, ici, où", it is elided:

• Jusqu'alors, il était calme

• La forêt s'étend jusqu'ici

• Jusqu'où êtes-vous prêt à investir ?

• Ma pelouse est tondue jusque-là (note the hyphen, like other words constructed with -là: celui-là, ce jour-là...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindyKMH

Once again you have come to my aid with a brilliant and thorough explanation. Therefore 'chez' is a proposition ? My husband is French and could not explain this rule to me (or maybe he is just to lazy……….) You should be writing a French grammar book - one that people can actually understand! Or as some others' have suggested, writing explanations professionally for Duolingo - merci mille fois


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyndiluwho

I've read all the posts and I still don't know where "all the way" comes into this sentence. I typed "she walks up to the man's house" and it was accepted, but was surprised by Duo's translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"all the way to" is another translation for "jusque/jusqu'à", with the same meaning as "up to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyndiluwho

Ok thanks, that wasn't in the drop down, but I'm really not relying on that as much as I used to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AussieCraig

I answered "She walks down to the man's home" and am marked wrong, while one correct answer given is "She walks up to the man's home". Why then when you mouse over jusque does it give you options for up to, or down to? Is it because she walks to the place of his house and no further? If so, how would jusque be used as 'down to' in a sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daveremy

Why "chez l'homme" rather than "chez homme"? Is the article required? I noticed in multiple questions on DuoLinggo "chez elle" which is "her house" with no article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Usually nouns need articles after a preposition (a few exceptions, like "sans sucre").

"elle" is a personal pronoun and as such does not need any article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rpears0n

"she walks to the man's house" WRONG "she walks to the man's home" OK, Why? not too many words, not wrong tense, .... When is it OK to translate chez -- house vs home?

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