https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Rolling 'R' Help

I can roll my 'R' extremely well but I have a very hard time going from a 'T' or a 'D' sound into the rolling 'R'... If I try to do it, it just makes a hiss from the top front of my mouth.

If I want to make the 'R' roll, I have to stop and draw out the 'D' or 'T'... For example... 'Drottning' for me would sound like 'De-rrrottning'

For native Swedish speakers, where is your tongue in your mouth when you make the 'T' or 'D' sound? In English for me it is pressed against my teeth.

I can roll my 'D' and 'T' into the rolling 'R' if I start my tongue where I roll my 'R'...? Is that where y'all are putting it?

Sorry if this is hard to understand lol.

August 3, 2015

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson

Maybe you can try to place your tongue a bit behind your teeth to make the Swedish t- and d-sound :)? I am doing some pronunciation experiments as I write and it seems like there is a difference between English T/D and Swedish ones. The new tongue position will hopefully make it easier to produce a soft roll "r" directly afterwards :).

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Thanks, that helps a bit. I put the tip of my tongue to the roof of my mouth about 1cm behind my teeth. It is a bit easier. Is that the correct place?

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson

Ha ha, sounds good!

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W

From Wikipedia: /t, l/ are dental [t̪, l̪],[30] but /n, d, s/ can be either dental [n̪, d̪, s̪] or alveolar [n, d, s].[31] If /d/ is alveolar, then /n/ is also alveolar.[32] Dental realization of /n, d/ is the predominant one in Central Standard Swedish.[32] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_phonology#Stops)

According to the same article, /r/ is alveolar but can be articulated in different modes (i.e. trill, flap fricative) depending on position. This is consistent with my own usage and my perception of Standard Swedish. I vary between between dental and alveolar /d/ freely but I only have dental /t/. After stops such as /t d/, /r/ is an alveolar flap or a fricative for me – almost never a trill unless I'm being very careful or putting a lot of emphasis.

To make things simple, you could say that I start at the inside of my teeth with t and d, and then move my tongue back to tap at the alveolar ridge.

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W

Here is an example of me saying dra in three different ways (with a fricative, flap, and a trill): http://vocaroo.com/i/s0cqd505OUcQ. I vary between the first two in normal speech.

August 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Or when I come out of a sound like "inte" and try to roll my 'r' it just doesn't work...

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/uniquedreams

Native Swedish speaker here. When I say 'Drottning', the 'R' is just a little soft roll. I think the 'D' in Swedish is also pressed against the teeth. And the 'T' is a little higher up. But I'm not sure.

August 3, 2015
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