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  5. "Viro kaj virino dancas."

"Viro kaj virino dancas."

Translation:A man and a woman dance.

August 3, 2015

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craaash80

When is "c" pronounced "k" and when "s/z"? I'm puzzled with that (Italian speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

In Esperanto, c is always pronounced like Italian z in grazie (so, like ts together) - never like k or s or English z or like Italian z in mezzo (/dz/).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craaash80

Oh, ok, simple as that. Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanGood1

Is the sentence without the article "A", also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/foo__bar

I don't think that would be proper English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KillTheFuture

"A man" is a single adult male human.

"Man" is an abbreviation of "mankind": all of humanity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorosph

But do they dance with the ugly baby?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dante805148

I put: a man and woman dance instead of: A man and a woman dance!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JALoeppky

Same here, can someone explain how this is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KillTheFuture

It is correct, and at some point after it was made into an accepted answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohammadKh190324

How can i say a man and a woman are dancing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The same way: Viro kaj virino dancas.

If you want to be explicit about the continuous aspect, the fact that they are dancing right now, you can also say Viro kaj virino estas dancantaj, but the continuous aspect is used less in Esperanto than in English and is not mandatory.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mark.materum

Could it mean "men and women dance". That is to say, men and women in general?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/foo__bar

I guess it could mean that in some context, for example when you're talking to someone who dances with who in general. But you could simply say 'Viroj kaj virinoj dancas', which means exactly 'Men and women dance'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mark.materum

I suppose the question comes to how Esperanto forms general constructions, that is to say, men, women, dogs, whatever in general. Is it like English where it's plural without an article, Spanish where it's singular with the article, or perhaps some other variation of singular and plural and article or lack of article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanguageForLife1

So, nouns by themselves automatically mean "A ____"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, not automatically. But they can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanguageForLife1

What I mean is, you don't need to put the equivalent of "a" in front of a noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bert-Timo

No, Esperanto doesn't have an indefinite article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartimaus

Then what magic is needed to divine when to use it? I didn't add the a's because there were no la's, but I got it wrong, but I've seen plenty of sentences using the la's.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Then what magic is needed to divine when to use it?

A knowledge of English grammar.

Which we assume that everyone who takes a Duolingo course labelled "learning ... from English" possesses.

I didn't add the a's because there were no la's,

la is "the", not "a".

Esperanto has no equivalent of "a".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cropmy5

Would 'A man and a woman dances' also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No - the subject is "a man and a woman", two people, and so you need agreement with third person plural - the same as the pronoun "they".

"They dances" is not correct, and neither is "A man and a woman dances".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimbojones733563

We dont choose the ballroom, we just dance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarberUSA

Pffft.... didnt add "A"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartimaus

There is no "la".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What's la got to do with "a"?

la is "the".

la viro = the man

viro = a man


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cameron582780

Would "the man and woman dance" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Would "the man and woman dance" also be correct?

No. Esperanto has a definite article, la, and it isn't in this sentence.

la viro = the man

But this sentence just has viro = a man.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oXHupzuG

I don't think this is correct grammar in english. It sounds like they're describing a type of dance - a "man-and-woman-dance". "A man and a woman is dancing" would be the correct way of saying it in english, no?

Is it only written in this way to teach us that Esperanto treats "a man and a woman" the same way as "they" gramatically?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"A man and a woman is dancing" would be the correct way of saying it in english, no?

No. "a man and a woman" are two people, so you have to say that they "are dancing", not "is dancing".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanetteFo14

So.. .... Viro is always "a man"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Viro is always "a man"?

That's right.

viro is one of Esperanto's comparatively-few strongly-gendered words: it always refers specifically to a male adult human being.

See also https://bertilow.com/pmeg/gramatiko/o-vortoj/seksa_signifo.html#i-b36 .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdelAbufah

Are dancing, wasn't good ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What was your entire answer?

Did you, perhaps, write "A man and a women are dancing", with "women" instead of "woman"?

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