1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Dutch
  4. >
  5. "Het konijn eet brood."

"Het konijn eet brood."

Translation:The rabbit is eating bread.

August 4, 2015

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teeseirelav

It sounds like conejo which is rabbit in Spanish!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

Coinín in Irish. And there's an old English word for rabbit: coney, as in Coney Island.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnafirth

That's definitely worth remembering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zii

To be fair new york city used to be New Amsterdam so it could easily be a curruption of the dutch word pver the years.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/River806726

I was instantly thinking of coinín too! Interesting, right? Do you think there is a connection?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniellucassss

Dutch: konijn - Spanish: conejo - Portuguese: coelho - Catalan: conill - omg, these words are very similar. lol It will be easier to assimilate, i hope.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnafirth

Yeah, it's helpful. A lot of European languages have the same roots; just have to go far enough back.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chingwa

Dutch is a Germanic language, while Spanish and Portuguese are Romance languages. They shouldn't have noticeably similar roots today, but there could be loan words resulting as cultures encountered one another. The Netherlands used to be a Spanish territory during the Age of Exploration, so there probably is a connection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Seemingly it's French loanword: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/konijn. Looking up etymologies for the English word "coney" it's apparently of Iberian (pre-Roman colonization origin), so likely Celtic (or from a predecessor of modern Basque). Although the modern Irish word "coinín" apparently also originates as a French loan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Limeila

French: gives the word "connin" to several European languages French: Now that everyone calls it that, let's call it "lapin."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dieter988776

They are all Indo-European languages. So they have a common root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punchybanny

And the German word is Kaninchen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LetiziaSales

Coniglio in italian :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianKoche1

That's because the Easter Bunny visited all those countries along with Conan O'Brien. The people got confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osbom7864

better then the dog eating the rabbit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredericGuilbert

a carrot is better for him i suppose


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason385813

Konijn sounds very similar to the Welsh word for rabbit, cwningen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yamyam8

Het konijn eet brood en de hond eet het konijn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuluPatulu

bad pronunciation for 'brood'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XLinkWarriorX

What bunny eats bread? Yes it aounds like conejo. Tho I cheated and said Conan. Did you know you can play the actual sound while the speaker is on and cheat. Thats not what I do but you can tho it wont help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Unhappy15

Nee, het konijn eet brood niet! Ik ben een konijn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joan194709

In other sentece, i used 'het olifant' and that 'het' was wrong, so 'de' was right... In comments, someone wrote a link and, after i read it, i thought a singular animal was treated as a male o female (not even children). But in this case, 'het konijn' is a right sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtalinaDove

I believe there's no definite pattern to which words are which gender, you just have to memorize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punchybanny

I am from Germany and for me it is easy because it is nearly the same in German. Der/die=de das=het


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam72608

olifant is a normal word, while konijn is a diminutive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanMcKee1

I wonder if it's just a carrot sandwich. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/distantcastle

Okay seriously, please never feed a rabbit bread,they can't eat it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyrasis

Not so sure about this new voice. Sounded like "valt" not "brood".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anurodh7

was the bread glueten free?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siddharaj6010

What would be translation of 'The rabbit eat bread' and 'The rabbit eats bread'?

Google translate shows same for all three sentences: 'Het konijn eet brood'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam72608

it's one rabbit so eatS. two rabbitS eat. but only in simple present tense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lindy273503

isnt konijn king in dutch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chingwa

Koning is king in Dutch, konjin is rabbit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nessie534325

"is eating bread" would be "esta comiendo pan" in Spanish. Therfore ..eats bread" is correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarleneMoar

Het konijn wordt ziek van brood!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianKoche1

Het konijn eet kinderin! Why can't I say that? I am getting bored.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/River806726

Hahahaha! Good one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron916324

So "Het konijn eet brood." I typed the rabbit eats bread and got it wrong because the translation:The rabbit is eating bread. surely these are the same as eet means eat/eats/eating?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piotr643841

Seriously? I gonna talking with Dutch people over rabbits eating a bread?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shyankv1

this is dum it is the same thing just have to add a s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianKoche1

The word is dumb, "dum" is "while" in Espéranto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HiMeCriss

Konijn reminds me of the Spanish word conejo, which also means rabbit ! I don't think it's a coincidence, the Netherlands has been under Spanish control for a while


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reebie14

The reader says things too quick and some words too quiet!

Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.