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https://www.duolingo.com/Farjo1

Well, something's going wrong!

Farjo1
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I feel my Spanish is improving and I practice every day (and Duo is but a part of that), and I have been learning more words, verb endings and grammar.

So why are my test scores falling?

2.62/5.0 just now 2.77/5.0 2 weeks ago 2.92/5.0 3 months ago 3.37/5.0 5 months ago 3.66/5.0 7 months ago 2.62/5.0 8 months ago

Anyone else got this pattern? Is the quiz really strict with punctuation and capitalisation? Is it marking me down for using British words? Any other ideas?

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

You say Duo is "but a part" of your learning. Duo tests only what Duo specifically teaches. You may be learning a lot of Spanish words, verb endings, and grammar that are not in Duo's 'knowledge base,' and I would not worry about it. The Duo Progress Test is to check on how well you know Duo's Spanish, not Spanish. ;) You can do a quick search on Google and find other tests that may test your Spanish more broadly than Duo does.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Farjo1
Farjo1
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I'm not worried more puzzled by that the score has been going down each test.

But perhaps that's the best answer - I've noticed before that Duo has narrow translations and maybe I've learned the 'wrong' ones outside Duo's strict mindset :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

Is it possible that these scores are not significantly different from one another? Do you know the confidence interval for the test you are taking?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Farjo1
Farjo1
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Thanks for the reply but I do not understand your question.

Those scores are for the last 6 tests I took - there are none in between.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sehjma
sehjma
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(I'm not a statistician), basically Malkin50 is saying maybe the way the test is constructed (number of questions, variety of questions from different skills, do the early questions have a greater impact on your overall score) maybe these scores aren't actually different

Basically, if you sat down and took the quiz 5 times in a row, without learning or practicing in between, you'd get different scores. Maybe you'd get more questions you happen to know, maybe you'd guess right more, maybe during one test you might be more fatigued than during the other ones.

The leap from 3.66 to 2.62 seems really big though, so I hope the test isn't that inaccurate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

Yes, sehjma is explains my point. "Confidence interval" describes the range of scores that a test taker might receive at any moment--so your true ability would lie within that range. A poorly constructed test would have a wide range and a better test would have a narrower range. You can learn more if you search online for "confidence interval testing"

I'd bet your skills are improving gradually and the test isn't constructed carefully enough to measure that improvement.

I'm not a statistician either, but I use testing regularly!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Farjo1
Farjo1
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Yea I get it. So as likely as not the next test I do might score 3.7 or 2.5.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Are you using Spanish Spanish rather than Duolingo Spanish and being marked down for that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Farjo1
Farjo1
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Good thinking but no, I've not really bothered with vosotros or vos and most people I meet in London are from South America. Perhaps they have all deliberately been teaching me the wrong words (like that Monty Python sketch and the Belgium(?) phrase book).

3 years ago