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"You would never have opened the door for me."

Translation:Nunca habrías abierto la puerta por mí.

3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SaidahWahid

I put " jamás habrías abierto la puerta por mi". I was wrong. Why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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The «por» is the wrong preposition, unless you actually do mean that "I" cannot do it, so "you" will open the door for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael209189

I would agree. I thought "para" would be more correct, as the door was being opened as a kindness to me to help me get through it, rather than somebody opening it on my behalf when it was my job to open it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A-mac72

Why does Nunca have to come before habrias? Does Habrias nunca abierto la puerta por mi? seem unnatural?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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Yes, that seems unnatural. Adverbs generally are the most flexible in terms of word order, but they normally do come before the conjugated verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anlgza
anlgza
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No me habrias nunca la puerta

Why is it wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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You are missing «abierto», and the adverb «nunca» should come before the conjugated verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anlgza
anlgza
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Thank you. But if you use "no" before then "nunca has to go after. Unless a double negative is never used in this particular example.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grace780329

Hi anlgza! I am a native Spanish speaker. Example: you can say: "No me habrías, nunca, abierto la puerta" continues the sentence with the motive, "cuando éramos niños porque eras mi hermano mayor y no eras gentil conmigo". Here "Never" emphasizes the phrase, why? Because you was my big brother and you were not polite with me. It is not very common. It can be too: "No me habrías abierto nunca la puerta", this is better the previous other one. You can use "no" and "never" togheter. Greetings:)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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Yes, «no» is never used with «nunca». «Nunca» does not have to pair up with another negative word; I am sorry that I did not notice that before

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grace780329

Hi ZuMako! I am a native Spanish speaker. Example: you can say: "No me habrías, nunca, abierto la puerta" continues the sentence with the motive, "cuando éramos niños porque eras mi hermano mayor y no eras gentil conmigo". Here "Never" emphasizes the phrase, why? Because you was my big brother and you were not polite with me. It is not very common. It can be too: "No me habrías abierto nunca la puerta", this is better the previous other one. You can use "no" and "never" togheter. Greetings:)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madix99

as one struggling to learn direct and indirect objects, I wrote: nunca me la habrias abierto la puerta.
I know it's not accepted, but is this something that would make sense?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Androo_
Androo_
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Both por and para are accepted here, but is there a reason to choose one over the other?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewsSuzy
AndrewsSuzy
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As others have said "para" seems to have a 'destination' in mind and "por" more of 'left behind'

So if you do something for someone, it's intended for them, it's "para"; if you do it on their behalf it's "por"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YAmr91

Why is it not "Tú nunca no habrías abierto la puerta por mí." I thought in spanish double (or more) negatives was the grammatically correct way?

similarly to how: "Hay alguien en la sala" negates to... "No hay nadie en la sala"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grace780329

Hi YAmr91! I speak Spanish. You can say: "Tú nunca habrías abierto la puerta...." or "Tú no habrías abierto la ...." or "Tú no habrías abierto la puerta nunca por mí" or "Tú no habrías abierto, nunca, la puerta por mí" (with emphasis) or "Tú no habrías, nunca, abierto la puerta por mí"( it is not very common, this seems forced). When you say "No hay nadie en la sala" you are denying "hay" and "nadie" this refers a person not a negation. There is or there is not a person. I hope you understand me. regards:)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YAmr91

Thanks for your explanation, I guess its something I have to pick up with time :s

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silk_Oak

I answered: "Nunca me hubieras abierto la puerta" but it was wrong according to duolingo. Why was it not accepted?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grace780329

Hi Silk! I speak Spanish. your sentence is fine, maybe DL wanted a exactly translation. It is the same meaning. Regards:)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankFox0

Why not: "Usted nunca me habría abierto la puerta."?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grace780329

Hi Frank! I am a native Spanish speaker. Your answer is well too and meaning the same. Maybe Dl wanted some more literal or exactly translation. Saludos:)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChiaraOber1
ChiaraOber1
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Tú instead of Usted counts as a mistake. Why the heck???

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stracm10

Very weird did not let me use nunca at the beginning and said that was wrong and let me use para mi

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Tener and Haber still confuse me a bit. Could you also say... Nunca tendrías abierto la puerta por mí... and if so does it carry a slightly different meaning or stress?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Tener is to possess, to own. Haber is more like "have happen to' or "exist". These are two ideas that Spanish distinguishes with different words, where English uses a catchall 'have'.
- I have a house in Valencia. = Tengo una casa en Valencia. (I own this)
- I have been to Valencia. = He sido en Valencia. (I had this experience)
You can see this best with the present tense of haber, where it just indicates the existence of something.
- Hay una casa en Valencia
Just as with ser/estar it is a question of essence, and there is no perfect rule for distinguishing between the two except grasping the intention of the verb: are you saying something exists or is it ownership?

FUN FACT: One place where they overlap in both languages is "having an obligation".
- Tenemos que ir a Valencia/Hay que ir a Valencia = We have to go to Valencia.

5 months ago