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https://www.duolingo.com/samrlevitt

Singlish, Scots, etc

samrlevitt
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My mom approached me today with an article on "Singlish," a nearly unintelligible dialect of English spoken in Singapore. Singapore's official language is English, but Mandarin, Arabic, Cantonese, Hindi, and other languages are spoken there, so to understand one another, everyone speaks Singlish on the street and English in formal situations. I heard about Scots from a Youtuber by the username of Xidnaf. Scots is a dialect of English spoken in, ya' guessed it, Scotland. It's much easier to understand than Singlish, but lots of sentences are very difficult. I was wondering, does anyone speak these or other dialects of English, and what are some of the quirks? What are some other cool English dialects that you know of? I personally speak a suburban Yidlish/Chinglish type dialect, which is completely understandable (this is because I'm Jewish, so I speak a little bit of Yiddish, and my mother spent time in Taiwan, so I speak a little bit of Mandarin. I live in a Chicago suburb which is veeery white, but also has a large Hispanic population at my school, so I kind of sound like a Jew who speaks a little Mandarin who hangs out with white people but also interacts with Hispanics all the time, which is what I am :P). Anyways, dialects, anyone?

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathangrant00
Jonathangrant00
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It's called "Hick Southern". :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samrlevitt
samrlevitt
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xD I completely forgot that one! The language of the rednecks. Awwwwww, fun times in the South

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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Tok Pisin and Bislama, spoken in Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu, respectively. They're both English-derived pidgin languages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claybird121

I'm from Houston Texas, and the family i'm close to are from Louisiana. My louisiana pawpaw( grandfather) was cajun/creole and spoke in such a way as most normal americans couldn't understand (he had some ability in cajun french as a child).
Houston has a few, apparently regional, terms like 'feeder road' (what others may call a frontage road) and "wrapping" a house (to cover it in toilet paper). I caught 'lightening bugs' as a kid, and when the sun is out and it happens to rain some people, usually older, may say, "The devil is beating his wife" (though locally many of us say 'the coyotes are getting married'[and coyote sounds like 'kai-yote", not 'kai-o-te'.]) I say graveyard, not cemetery. 'Aint' is common, so is 'fix'n" as in 'i'm fix'n to go to work'. Louisiana speak sometimes has cajun or creole words mixed in, like lagniappe (lanyap) meaning extra, or fei do-do (time to do the doh = time for sleep). In Louisiana you may tell kids about the rougarou monster, a sort of werewolf-bigfoot creature. Here slow moving water channels are called bayous and can be pronounced like bae-you or bae-oo. We of course say 'yall' pretty commonly as a second person plural.

You should look into louisiana french and louisiana english.

Also, there has been some talk as to create a conlang called "Texan" among some friends.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UsernameJanina

There is this cool dialect my mother used to speak called Pidgin English. It's spoken in Nigeria (and in the vicinity). It is relatively easy to understand.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greg.mort
greg.mort
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Hawaiian Pidgin

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SwampyBones

I speak a wee bit of Scots, although I tend to mostly speak in GAE (General American English) with a slight Scottish lilt.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CallumRoy
CallumRoy
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Scots, in ancient times, was actually a sister of English rather than a dialect, but it is now effectively a dialect. Or even an accent with some regional vocabulary and tendencies towards certain grammatical constructions. Although the northern dialects of Scots, such as Doric, are more divergent. See this old sketch set in my hometown. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ot__1K4c0Zw

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MacIomhair
MacIomhair
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Scots was long thought of as a dialect but linguists now accept it as a distinct language (or even half language) of the same family as English. Liverpudlian is more correctly a dialect than Scots. More details: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scots_language

3 years ago