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  5. "Dolma yaptım, yer misin?"

"Dolma yaptım, yer misin?"

Translation:I made dolma, would you like to eat?

August 7, 2015

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/modene1

I'd certainly agree in that I've never heard such an expression, nor do I expect to. Adding a some at the end makes a world of difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

This is already accepted, although not necessarily required in English :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

I agree with SuperMark here, on the phone where one has to choose the words, the sentence seems incomplete. Are you sure it is grammatically correct in this form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirage20

"I made dolma, will you eat"? seems grammatically incorrect (sounds incomplete) to me. The addition of "some" is essential in English. (Will you eat some / would you like some / won't you have some) seem the most natural and polite ways of asking in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsfanDiars

I wrote: " do you like to eat it?", it was rejected, the correct answer shown, was: " do you want to eat it? " !! I read the all the comments, the most common in English could be, would you like some, Even a very short informal, "like some ?"or "want some?" with the same token , " do you like to eat it?", should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percusse

do you like to eat is not correct. That is used when asking whether you like eating dolma in general. would you like to eat or taste is asking for a choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsfanDiars

We know the common use of simple present tense, in context there are other uses, it could be looked up in an advanced grammer book or other sources.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percusse

Or being a native speaker helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsfanDiars

Dear Percusse sorry to say this, no it does not help. Many native speakers of any language on earth do not know the grammer of their native land in full, and do not let the name be a criterion. ;) ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsfanDiars

BTW, there was an "It" at the end of my suggestion! Without that you are right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percusse

well, as you wish, but it is still wrong. And let me assure you I know my own language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliaStron4

No English speaker would use this sentence. It could be "Would you like to eat some of the dolma I have made?" or I've made stuffed peppers. Would you like to eat some?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

The only problem I see is that this is an improper comma splice and should rather be two sentences. "I made dolma. Would you like to eat?" These are sentences I, a native speaker of US English, would say. It would be more common for me to say "Would you like one?" as the second sentence, but I might very well ask the more general "Would you like to eat?" in certain circumstances, when I know the person has come to do some other activity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliaStron4

Yes, they are right. It really should be: "I have made dolma. Would you like to eat some?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuhailBanister

"Dolma" sounded like a word this student heard before, and it took him a few minutes to figure out why. Some distance from Topkapi Palace, well to the east of the Golden Horn, there is another Sultan's Palace, built 400 years later, located on the European shore. It is named for the ground on which it was built: Dolmabahçe. We learned later on that it meant, "filled (-in) garden. It is recorded that the building, megalomaniacal in design, was built on land reclaimed from the Bosporus by dumping a huge amount of land fill collected elsewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sevdigim.dil.TUR

am i asking will you eat or am i asking do you eat DOLMA generally, because we have the same way of asking in my language (Syrian Arabic) and it is not used to ask ''will you eat'' but ''do you generally eat DOLMA''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 2136

Isn't "Dolma" referring to stuffed cabbage or grapevine leaves? I always thought that they were counted; as in: 1 dolma, 2 dolmas, etc...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

It is referring to that, but I have always her the dish used as a mass noun in English :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 2136

If you look on line (eg, Amazon), you can see that "dolmas" is used often enough for the generic mass noun... Thanks for the huge help with getting us on board with this course! I look forward to learn more Turkish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

It has been (somewhat begrudgingly) added :) It still sounds a bit goofy to my ears, but my ears are not the ultimate protector of the English language :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 2136

Yeah, English is not my native language either but I lived around English speaking folks so long that I tend to think mostly in English. Thanks again for your great contributions!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 2136

BTW, do you know of any plans to get the "Immersion" feature available in the EN-TK course? Teşekkür ederim!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibektas34

First one is "dolma", the second one is "sarma".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmmms

I always thought dolma were the things that were hollow and filled (peppers, hollowed out courgettes and eggplants) and sarma were the things that were wrapped - cabbage, grape and chard leaves. It makes the most literal sense. I suspect that it is confused by the fact that the Greeks refer to sarma as dolmades.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibektas34

"Dolma" as a noun, comes from a Turkish verb "dol-mak"which means "to fill". Similarly, "sarma" as a noun comes from another Turkish verb "sar-mak" which means "to wrap".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmmms

Farkindayim. Yani sararsan sarma olmasi lazim. içi bos sebzeleri doldurursan, dolma olmasi lazim. ID-007 lahana sarmasi ve uzum yaprak sarmasindan bahsetti ve siz biri dolma bir sarma diye soyledin. Bana gore yapraktan yapilmis ise, sarma olmasi lazim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alibektas34

Türkçeniz çok akıcı! Tebrik ederim! ♡


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NezihD
  • 1998

i cooked dolma, would you like to eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

"Dolma yaptım, yer misin?" Translation: I made dolma, would you like to eat?

&

I have made dolma, will you eat some?

Correct other English answer accepted by Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nellaloggia

What of the Turkish in this example? Wouldn't a proposal like this usually be phrased with an "... ister misin"? And would the complete sentence be: "Dolma yaptım, yemek ister misin?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

nellaloggia

Hello.

Yemek - (verb) "to eat."

"Dolma yaptım, yemek ister misin?" I have made dolma, would you like to eat some?

I think your answer is better than Duo's as I have combined my other correct answer with yours.

Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlWiddows

Sorry, but 'will you eat?' is just not English usage. It is the sort of thing my Turkish family would say whereas we would say 'I have made dolma. Do you want some?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SONq97Pt

The translation - as with many - does not sound right in English. As an English speaker I often have to remind myself of what Duolingo has decided is the right answer even if it doesn't make sense in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

In English (at least my English), we say WILL you eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Where are you from? :) That sounds a little funky to my American self, but I might be willing to add it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Oh, I missed the word "like" in this answer. I thought the required translation was "would you eat" which is even more stilted to my very American ears (Washington State, Connecticut, New York, Indiana, Chicago) than the "will you eat" that I put. "Would you like to eat" sounds much more idiomatic to me, but I was looking for a verb of wanting or liking (e.g. yemek istiyor musun?). As a child, I often heard people say "will you have something to eat" in the same way one might say "will you have a glass of wine," but that might be a Northwestern thing, or even something rather unique to my family.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

"will you have a glass of wine" almost sounds passive aggressive to me...or just directly aggressive :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheridanZhoy

I always took this construction in Turkish to be equivalent to "won't you..." in English--kind of implying that it's a favor to you. "Won't you have a look?" (Bakar mısın?) "Won't you drink some tea?" (Çay içer misin?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanBod
  • 1573

"Will you have a glass of wine" or "are you having wine" are heard regularly in England.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

You know, I think this is something I used to hear, but it might also be something I read or heard in a movie. I have dabbled in so many languages and read so many old books that I may no longer be able to distinguish between what is archaic, what is foreign, and what is just odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eddpayne

"Will you have a glass of wine" is a pretty standard and polite way of asking in Ireland :)

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