https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotCiro

The Russian course is coming!

Pryviet! the Russian course will be available soon! I recommend a page for improve your Russian http://www.privyetrussian.com/alphabet/en It's a good page,you can learn how to write and how to read in Russian first,have a good day!

August 7, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ianbewavy96

I'm also so excited for the Russian course on Duolingo. Another great site to jump start your Russian is memrise.com ( also an app too). Memrise teaches you the Russian alphabet as well as plenty of other useful stuff. hope this helps!!!!!

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotCiro

Thanks!

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpracheShinobi

I really look forward to the Russian course too! I have been studying Russian for nearly 15 years - it was my first foreign language pursuit, and my most difficult. While I am certainly not fluent, I have investigated the grammar enough to know that I can help many fellow students along the way. There will be a lot of comments and clarifications that I anticipate making.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bricejohnson2003

I use a mixture of Pimsleur, Rocket language, and memrize.

Pimsleur cost money, but if you don't have the money for the program. You could pirate it for free if you're that type of person.

Rocket Language cost money but it is like a private lessons. It is my personal favorite.

Memrize is free and very hyped up on Duo and other boards. It is free and it is effective. But I think that it is almost useless for Russian unless you have some Russian knowledge because of how the Russian language is very versatile. I used Memrize for German and Spanish with great success. But it wasn't as effective with Russian. Maybe for you it will be different.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erven.R

> Pimsleur cost money, but if you don't have the money for the program. You could pirate it for free if you're that type of person.

Felt a bit guilty there. XD I pirated like 3 languages , I think? French, Chinese, and forgot the other one. It was 2 years ago, back when I was 11. Haha

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chilvence

I have practically all of them... Heh. I found the first one I tried so helpful that I felt compelled to collect as many as I could just in case I or any of my friends could benefit from them.

And I don't feel the slightest bit guilty, their business model is senseless. I don't buy the idea that their courses are worth hundreds of dollars when all they needed to to is make the course once, and then sit back and print money. It practically offends me. They could sell it for a dollar and become instant billionaires, because a billion people would look at it and say 'oh, it's only a dollar, what the hell.'

I grew up in southeast Asia though, In many cases the asking prices of software are so far removed from the reality of what people actually earn that they are practically asking people to make a black market. When I was there pirated software was the norm, legal was the exception. Were talking about the countries that actually make your computers in the first place, of course they aren't taking anyone seriously when they ask a week or a months wages for a single disk...

I'm sorry, I went off on a tangent there.

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherub721

How does Rocket Languages work?

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bricejohnson2003

You can try it for free here: http://goo.gl/Sqwgq0

Rocket language works with mostly active recall. It is a classroom like atmosphere that you can repeat as many times as you want. Every lesson, they have a 20-25 min podcast with usually three people. A protagonist and two other native speakers, and they explore the country you are studying at while teaching you words in different situations. After the podcast, they followed with different types of test (Hear it say it, Write it, Know it, play it, and quiz). The podcast is very helpful because they dig deeper into your choice language's culture and grammar without getting too complicated. They also have reading material for some languages.

They just came out with Rocket Russian this year and I already completed all the lessons on it this summer. I am still reviewing the cases, tenses, and random survival courses to prepare myself for Duo's course on Russian. It is a little expensive for some people, but they do like to make deals almost every month or holiday. I think that they had the "end of summer sale" but I think it may be already over. They used to have a loophole where if you did use their free program, you just cancel on the final day they they give you a 50% discount, but they stopped that. I already tried the German and I just got the Spanish lessons. So I guess you can say I am very satisfied with it.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherub721

Thank you! I'll check out the free trial.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RLaurier

Another page for Russian beginners worth a visit: http://masterrussian.com/

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bar_an

I really recommand on this website: http://learnrussian.rt.com/ . I currently learning from it. It can give you a little head-start when the course come out. Also you can use it to learn the grammar.

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotCiro

Thanks by the likes!

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PotatoSanta

Hopefully it will be easier to do the course than Ukrainian, I have given up until it's out of beta.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

Yeah I am very confused, but oh well. Russian and Ukrainian are very similar so I'm betting it will be just as hard, but if we finish the Ukrainian course we might have a better understanding of Russian

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flootzavut

You will have some understanding of cases and things, but be aware that in some places Russian and Ukrainian use cases slightly differently, and while there are some verbs that are identical, there are others that vary slightly and still others which are completely different. Also the way they use Cyrillic is slightly different. A good, solid grounding in one will give you a head start in the other (speaking as a russophone who completed the Ukrainian tree), but I'm not convinced that dabbling in one will do much for your progress in the other.

Given the availability of Russian study materials, if it's Russian you actually want to learn, I'd suggest the intervening period is better spent learning Russian using other resources than in using Duolingo to study Ukrainian.

Just my two cents, YMMV.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherub721

"but be aware that in some places Russian and Ukrainian use cases slightly differently, "

This is going off topic a bit, but I heard the Ukrainian course didn't go in-depth into some of the cases other than accusative... specifically there wasn't much genitive. Is that true? I didn't go far enough into the UKR tree to tell. I really hope the Russian course will have a lot of practice with the cases that are used a lot. I finished the reverse tree and I don't feel like I have a good grasp on genitive at all, which is used a lot in Russian (not blaming the course creators, since the course was for English learners and it's not really an issue in English).

"Given the availability of Russian study materials, if it's Russian you actually want to learn, I'd suggest the intervening period is better spent learning Russian using other resources than in using Duolingo to study Ukrainian."

I totally agree. I've been using memrise, Pimsleur, Michel Thomas, and reading about the grammar on blogs to work through the reverse (RUS->ENG) course and I think that's more helpful than using the Ukrainian course. I did enough of the Ukrainian course to satisfy my curiosity, but only up to the point where I felt secure in my Russian, that the Russian was in my long term memory and the Ukrainian wouldn't confuse me.

August 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flootzavut

I certainly felt that my Russian was a huge help on the Ukrainian course, and I'm not convinced I would have learned all I needed to know without that basis... It's been a while since I completed the tree so my memory of how the course was is kind of blurry! I've been trying to make my Ukrainian and Esperanto trees gold, which has involved more doing piecemeal work on bits and pieces of the tree rather than really sitting down and looking at the structure/how much practice I got in various aspects, if you see what I mean? And it's kind of hard for me to judge anyway, because coming at it from the POV of having a solid, if rusty, grasp of Russian, it's kind of hard to judge whether the amount of practice I got was sufficient, if that makes any sense??

(I started the Ukrainian course quite tentatively, because I wasn't sure if it was just going to mash my brain. I remember more Russian than I think I do, evidently. What I would looooove to see would be a Ukrainian-from-Russian course, ditto other Slavic language pairs, because I feel like with related languages, it would be so helpful to directly compare them to see similarities and differences. I really hope we will get those one day, because that would be great!)

I feel like I'm being clear as mud here. It's been a stressful couple of months in my bit of the world and I'm not at my most concise.

Congrats on finishing the Russian-English tree! ;D I don't think the genitive is as terrifying as some people like to claim it is ;) but I get the impression the Russian team are aiming to give a really solid grounding in the cases so... here's hoping, eh? With the reverse tree and a bunch of solid study under your belt, you will certainly be going in with an excellent grounding.

August 9, 2015
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