"Se ela quisesse falar com alguém, ela teria trazido um amigo."

Translation:If she wanted to talk to someone, she would have brought a friend.

10/22/2013, 3:05:12 AM

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kaiseresc

I typed: if she wanted to talk to somebody, she would've brought a friend
and it came out wrong, saying I should have not added the "'ve" with the correction saying it should be "would have". Makes no sense.

11/1/2013, 11:34:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/lugosky
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It's a software not a person. Report it and eventually they will add it.

4/26/2014, 7:09:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/rickharned
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Why is "anybody" not an acceptable substitute for "somebody" here?

5/14/2014, 2:10:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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Anybody is accepted, anyone is not...

5/26/2014, 2:17:57 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Wolfreuter

I'll try to explain, but will be very hard because even brazilians don't know much about the differences.

Some is "algum", "alguém" or "alguns", so you are saying you want to talk with someone at moment, think about you just arriving in a house and no one is there, and you shout: there is somebody here?

Any is qualquer, plural quaisquer. Means that you want to talk with somebody, but anyone, no matter who, no matter how. Think about you lost in Sahara desert, and you wish to talk with ANYONE.

But why is not acceptable? No logical reason, it can be a substitute. Just in a complex semantical discussion isn't the same.

1/3/2015, 5:24:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/rickharned
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Thanks, Wolfreuter! But I have to differ on your "somebody" example. If I arrive at a house and nobody answers, I'm likely to call, "Is anybody here?". On the other hand, if I hear a noise, I may say "Is somebody there?" It's just a little bit more specific. Somebody must have made the noise (although it could have been anybody, we're just not likely to say that!)

1/4/2015, 11:10:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl
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In English I would say, "If she had wanted to talk to someone, she would have brought a friend." It's not that way in the Portuguese, but if I found that sentence in a book I was translating I would definitely say "had wanted". After all, when she was planning to come she probably didn't know it was going to be so boring she would want to talk to someone. My question: Would a Brazilian ever use "teria querido" in this context?

4/9/2018, 5:57:06 AM
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