"Na geladeira tem leite e um sanduíche."

Translation:There is milk and a sandwich in the fridge.

December 31, 2012

28 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/compotrigo
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This correction is wrong!!!

I write "In the fridge there are milk and A sandwich", and duolingo says "In the fridge there are milk and sandwich".

"UM sanduíche" = "A sandwich"

December 31, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/serraesilva
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it is corrected, apparently =)

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliewilman
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it is corrected if you start the sentence "There are..." but if you start "in the fridge there are..." they still leave out the essential "a". Having looked at the other point "are" is clearly better English, BUT IN SPEAKING people often adjust what they are saying as they go along, so no one would be upset if you said "There is milk in the fridge - and a sandwich." or even "In the fridge there's milk - and a sandwich."

February 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Complex77
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... and as we are learning Portuguese here (altough I also appreciate the English lessons ...), would tem or têm (plural) be the really correct form here?

March 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Good question!

November 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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In this role "ter" is impersonal and always conjugated in the third person singular. So both "there is" and "there are" are translated by "tem" (or more formally "há").

November 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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When the noun phrase consists of two or more nouns in a list, we use a singular verb if the first noun is singular or uncountable, and a plural verb if the first noun is plural.

Cambridge Advanced Grammar in Use

• There is an apple and some oranges in the basket.
• There is juice and six eggs in the refrigerator.
• There are oranges and a bottle of milk in the refigerator.

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/oJNASc

It depends on the linking word. If the linking word is 'and', the subject will be plural, but if it is 'or' the subject depends on the first noun. Find out about: 'with', 'either', 'as well as' and other linking words/phrases.

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/hth2007
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Are you sure? The answer worked for me.

February 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/katep1991

Would 'You have milk and a sandwich in the fridge' be a possibility?

July 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lugosky
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No. For that you'd have to refer to a person: 'você tem...', or 'na geladeira... ...para você'

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/akshay9999

"Tem leite e um sanduíche na geladeira."

Is this sentence correct?

December 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ajchaves

what is the difference between frigorifico and geladeira

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/fernandoramires

In Brazil, frigorífico is used to designate large refrigerators, especially used by the butcher shops to conserve the meat. We would use either geladeira or refrigerador for refrigerator/fridge.

October 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia_pulia

Well, the same with me and "There are" pointed as a mistake. It appears that if we speak right it is a mistake, but if we speak as Americans do in their speech it will be treated as a right answer. I don't get the logic! And if it its so, so what kind of Portuguese are we learning?

April 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/vitoritaeu

is "there are" wrong hier?

October 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Torcoclown

"There are" is correct but most Americans would say "there is". In formal writing, you are taught to rewrite the sentence to remover "there".

January 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SilentAnnie

I think so, because there IS milk AND a sandwich in the fridge. The word "and" makes the second part of the sentence more or less a new sentence. Therefore you cannot use ARE. Hope you can make heads and tails from this :-)

July 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelagrac3

I never learned this structure for "there is/there are" in Portuguese classes. I always thought it was "há...". Is this a Brazilian thing?

June 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Unexplorer
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Hmm. I'm surprised that "There are milk and a sandwich in the refrigerator" is incorrect. "Milk and a sandwich" are the plural subject of the English construction.

I do understand that some people use a singular verb for plural objects, but that doesn't make proper usage incorrect.

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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When the noun phrase contains two or more nouns, we use a singular verb if the first noun is singular or uncountable, and a plural verb if the first noun is plural.

There is a bottle of milk and some eggs in the fridge.
There are some eggs and a bottle of milk in the fridge.

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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That seems to be a sensible approach, intermediate between always using "there's" and formal agreement as advocated here:

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/oddness-when-you-start-a-sentence-with-there-is

While I find "There are a couch and a coffee table in the room" hard to accept, The Cambridge Guide to English Usage says that formal agreement is strictly maintained in academic writing. It is probably a good idea to avoid "there is/are" with lists in that case.

Oh, what do you mean by "It works that way in Portuguese as well"? Using "haver/ter" to translate "there is/are" seems to work quite differently, so do you mean "existir" inflects in this way?

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Do you remember that we met the expletive "there" when we were diagramming sentences?

According to Swan, informal English solves the awkward "There are a couch and a coffee table" construction by the contraction: "There's a couch and a coffee. We just don't write it.

"Existir" inflects like normal verbs, unlike "há" and "tem".

My reference to similarity with Portuguese had to do with verbs and compound subjects. Verbs that come before the subject can either be plural (by including all the components) or singular by focusing on proximity to one "nucleus" of the subject.

See Part 3: http://www.soportugues.com.br/secoes/sint/sint53.php

September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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Yes, I do remember that lesson, in fact, I'm sure it was then that you taught me this use of the word expletive. It was definitely the first time I'd come across sentence diagramming. Thanks for the useful link - it's now clear what you meant.

September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/strogito
September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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When I read "It works that way in Portuguese as well". I thought Elaine meant that the Cambridge Advanced Grammar guidelines mirrored the inflection choices made in Portuguese.

Because, and your helpful links illustrate this clearly, the two main ways of expressing "there is/are" in Portuguese don't inflect with number, I thought she must be talking about the third method, the verb "existir", which does,

Here are four sentences based on Elaine's English examples:

  1. "Existe uma garrafa de leite e alguns ovos na geladeira"
  2. "Existem uma garrafa de leite e alguns ovos na geladeira"
  3. "Existe alguns ovos e uma garrafa de leite na geladeira"
  4. "Existem alguns ovos e uma garrafa de leite na geladeira"

If the guidelines were applied here, we should use sentences 1 and 4. Elaine's link seems to suggest that only sentence 3 should be rejected. Do you agree?

September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/strogito

Somtimes Existir sounds a thing that you've found out.

HAVER is formal and TER though it's ONLY colloquial.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6OxrRSurhc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43iWAosgWM8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXvuQhJhs6g

I'll learn about verbal concordance yet. I'm newbie to ask your answer. By spoken language, just 1 and 4 seems correct.

September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl
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Why is "she has" wrong here?

July 30, 2017
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