"You can check this with them."

Translation:Usted puede comprobar esto con ellos.

4 years ago

86 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MLangler195

'Verificar' is used quite a lot within southern spain to mean 'to check'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/explodingferret

It's certainly better than chequear, which is an Anglicism you might want to avoid.

Comprobar, revisar, confirmar could ask work too.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DroppedBass
DroppedBass
  • 24
  • 14
  • 14
  • 484

"Chequear" doesn't mean "To check" (verificar), it means "To check (it) out".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jevsimmons

yes, I would have thought verificar would have worked

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gus_tavo2000
gus_tavo2000
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 7
  • 999

ustedes pueden comprobar esto con ellos should be accepted too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travelingplans

But it's still marked wrong on 11/27/14

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

It is now accepted

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriQuaid
LoriQuaid
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10

How about "confirmar" for "check"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Justin-B
Justin-B
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 1755

I think that "confirmar" would be acceptable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daphne177862

Confirmar did not work for me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

In this context it seems a lot of verbs could work

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christinina98

Didn't work for me oct '17

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michaelvallarta

why is tu puedes , not accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

Did you use the tú that is accented? The other one means your.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyGolda

Reported on10/27/14: No context to indicate one person or many persons referred to as "YOU" The translation is valid for You referring to multiple persons and should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lainie44

Why can't I put "esto" at the beginning of the sentence? I wrote "Esto puedes comprobar con ellos" and it was marked wrong. Is there a rule for this placement that I need to use?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gom8z

"This you can test with them" is not English or Spanish grammar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
  • 22
  • 196

Many references I've seen indicate that in Spanish, unlike English, direct object pronouns usually precede the verb. See http://www.indiana.edu/~call/reglas/pron_comp_dir.html for one example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

Well, you are right, direct object pronouns usually precede the verb, like indirect object pronouns, reflexive pronouns, etc.

I think your main problem is you are misunderstanding "esto" and you are considering it a direct object pronoun. Well, "esto", which means "this", is the direct object and it is truly a pronoun, a demonstrative pronoun. But it is NOT a direct object pronoun because direct object pronouns (and IO and reflexive pronouns) are always personal pronouns.

Personal pronouns are those that refers to people/objects. The most known pronouns of this type are "yo, tú, vos, él, ella, usted, nosotros, nosotras, vosotros, vosotras, ellos, ellas, ustedes" but there are a few more: "mi, me, conmigo, ti, te, contigo, lo, la, le, consigo, se, sí, nos, os, los, las, les" and in a few situations "ello".

But not all of them are used for the same purpose: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ABfo-VM-STY/Vgj0lhL8BUI/AAAAAAAAAAM/2usH-rKs99U/s1600/Pronombres_personales.png

Only pronouns in the second and third rows of the previous image can precede verbs.

BUT, when we talk about preceding verbs we talk about putting the pronouns just before the verb. So, in fact, you can change the "normal" order of the sentence to put the direct object before the verb, as in "Esto puedes comprobar con ellos" (remember "esto" is the direct object itself not the pronoun that normally would replace it). I answered long ago another reply with the same doubt that it is correct.

Now that I have done a better research, I have to add something. Spanish admit some changing in sentence order, so putting direct object before the verb is correct, but if you do that you MUST ADD the appropriate direct object pronoun in the sentence:

NO "Esto puedes comprobar con ellos"

YES "Esto LO puedes comprobar con ellos"

YES "Esto puedes comprobarLO con ellos"

PS.- I hope you understand everything I want to tell here xD. If something is not clear or you have another question, I'll try to explain it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Yes, lots of useful clarifying information. Have a lingot!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
  • 22
  • 196

Thank you for that detailed explanation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

If I understand you correctly, you are saying that you can put the direct object pronoun either at the end of the infinitve OR before the helping verb "puedes." Can you supply another example with a verb that is reflexive. I would like to know how to put in a reflexive pronoun when there already are direct and indirect object pronouns. If you can, please use a different example that does not use "esto.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

Well, I'll try it. I'm going to use the verb "lavarse" (to wash yourself).

  • Yo tengo que lavarme mi cara (I have to wash my face).

From now on I will omit the subject. The sentence shows the "me" (reflexive pronoun for first person singular) where the infinitive form has the "se". But it can be relocated before the verbal group (even before the helping verbs):

  • Me tengo que lavar mi cara.

The face is the direct object so it can be replace by "la". The DO pronoun must be located with the reflexive pronoun, that means that if the reflexive pronoun appears before the verb the DO pronoun must appear before and if it appears at the end of the infinite the DO will also appear there. And always in this order: reflexive first, DO then.

  • Tengo que lavarmela (I have to wash it).

  • Me la tengo que lavar.

If the DO is masculine, like el pelo (the hair), the pronoun would be "lo" instead of "la" but the location and the order is the same.

I also try to search for a reflexive pronoun and Indirect object but I can't find any and I think it's because in a reflexive sentence the IO is the same as the subject, so the reflexive pronoun is the IO.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

I have read the reply I just made and I have to say that reflexive pronouns are the same as IO pronouns. I was treating them as other type of pronouns. I don't know why :)

So, yes, everything explained here can also be applied in normal DO-IO sentences like: "mando una carta a mi madre" (I send a letter to my mother)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mstahr11

why is "lo" no accepted as in: "Lo puedes comprobar esto con ellos?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

"Lo" and "esto" are referring the same thing. It is a little redundant. You can say "¿Lo puedes comprobar con ellos?" or "¿Puedes comprobar esto con ellos?" but the meaning changes a bit, like using "it" and "this" in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Álvaro, it looked perfect to me - no mistakes. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

Thank you. I had already forgotten this reply hahaha, so thank you for your answer. It is always fantastic to know I didn't make any mistakes. ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sihayanami
sihayanami
  • 24
  • 24
  • 11
  • 8
  • 2
  • 2
  • 14

I think because "lo" means "it," so you wouldn't need that if you already have "esto"/"this." Your sentence would translate to something like "It you can check this with them" , "You can check it this with them", or "You can check this it with them," none of which make any sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RinnyJ
RinnyJ
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12
  • 7
  • 3
  • 3

I wondered the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
  • 25
  • 21
  • 11
  • 1434

This is very odd: Duolingo accepts the vos form (podés) for this sentence but not the vosotros form (podéis).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omgpenny

I have been taught verificar on other courses

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fserron

I have seen this kind of problem in some other questions... "Puede comprobarlo con ellos." is also a valid answer. The "lo" at the end of "comprobarlo" is indicating that you are speaking of something. It's the same as "Puede comprobar esto con ellos", but it's more "elegant".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sihayanami
sihayanami
  • 24
  • 24
  • 11
  • 8
  • 2
  • 2
  • 14

Yes, though "lo" has a meaning more like "it," and "esto" is the word that most directly translates into "this." The difference is subtle, but there still is one. Do you know if they still accepted your variation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisMora332666

Tu and usted is same thing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Beez
Dr.Beez
  • 24
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5

Is "Les puedes comprobar esto" or "Esto puedes comprobarles" OK?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Somebody downvoted your question because they didn't like it, but it seemed like an honest question to me so I restored your zero.

Although "les" does mean "them," it is an IO pronoun and therefore can't be used as the object of the preposition "con." English uses nominative pronouns (called subject pronouns in Spanish) 1) to be the subject of the sentence, and 2), to be a subject complement, aka "a predicate noun ("It is I," "I am he," etc.) English and Spanish use both object pronouns for direct and indirect objects. However, while English uses object pronouns to follow prepositions (like me, for you, to him, etc.), Spanish does the opposite and uses subject pronouns (mí, tí, nosotros/nosotras, and ellos/ellas) as the objects of prepositions (sin mí, con él, a ella, etc.).

So, the short answer to your question is no. "Les" is an object pronoun and thus has no place in a translation of "You can check this with them," which needs to contain the prepositional phrase "con ellos."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bassbonestones

I used Mexican "chequear" and it accepted it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peace2105
peace2105
  • 25
  • 11
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 93

Duolingo tells me that chequear is the right answer, but when I click on the comments section, it says it used comprobar instead of chequear. I don't know why Duolingo does this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 28

They also say "checar" :) But I don't know if it's accepted by Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 315

"checar" is appropriate and it was accepted by DL in a previous exercise ("They cannot check this?"), but not this time! (9 Feb 2018)

I understand that the most common translations of "(to) check" are revisar, checar, verificar, and comprobar, but there are several other options in Spanish and also several meanings of "to check" in English.
Check out http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=check

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 24

Really?! Hmmm, I was just dinged for using "chequear" (13 de Feb 2015)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

My Larousse All Spanish Verbs from A to Z with a Mexican flag (and a Spanish flag, too) on the cover, does not even list the verb CHEQUEAR. Is it a valid Latin American verb? Gracias.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 24

I wasn't even familiar with this term; only that I heard it once and decided to use it in the exercise, if only to see if Duo would accept it. But I've read that it's being used also in Colombia and Venezuela to mean "to check in" (luggage, when flying). My keyboard auto-spells it, and, although an anglicism, the RAE recognizes it (with listed meanings of: "Examinar, controlar o cotejar algo"), so I guess that makes it valid (?). By the way, even "checar" is recognized by the RAE as (Mex) chequear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric427702

Yes chequear is used here in colombia

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Gracias, Greg. Interesante.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stacybass

I thought este was nuetral this. Why esto in this sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mstahr11

esto is neutral. este is masculine singular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

Why not "revisar"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

to revise does not = to check.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

Averiguar is a very common word with the same meaning. This should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Tienes razón. Muy común y muy irregular.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bhaynes1

I agree that revisar should work here. According to my dictionary it can mean to revise or to check and it is used in the same context so it should have been accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarmaCrisis

Can anyone explain to me why "los puedes comprobar con ellos" doesn't work?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FraserRowa

"Esto puedes chequear con ellos" was not accepted. Should it be?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

Well, the words are correct, but nobody would use it in that order. It sounds weird and unnatural, I do not really know why. It is the same as in English: "This you can check with them". I am not English native but I think it sounds wrong.

I think, but I'm not sure, that the problem is that is difficult to understand that "Esto" is the DO instead of the subject of your sentence, so you can "fix" it if you add a "lo" (Direct Object pronoun) to your sentence before or after the verb: "Esto lo puedes chequear con ellos" and "Esto puedes chequearlo con ellos". Doing this makes clear that "Esto" is the Do.

In Spanish, like in English and many others languages, the favourite grammar order in a sentence is Subject + Verb + Complements. (Yes, Spanish is more flexible than English, but not always) So if you are not really sure about an orden in a sentence, try to use that order and forget the rest. (Remember, in Spanish subject pronouns can be omitted.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I would add that while subject pronouns can be omitted, additional object pronouns are added for clarity even when they are not manditory. I need someone else to give an example, though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FraserRowa

Muchas gracias! I'll try to remember that order from now on.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnieHayd

Esto sé puede comprobar con ellos? Should this be accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

It could mean something really similar, but i would not say it is an accurate answer.

Mainly, because the original sentence and your translation are not in the same "voice". The original one is active voice and your sentence is passive voice. In fact, I think that your translation is a "pasiva refleja", which is a special type of Spanish passive sentences.

You can check this with them = Tu puedes comprobar esto con ellos. (Active)

This can be checked with them = Esto puede ser comprobado con ellos. (Normal passive)

This can be checked with them = Esto se puede comprobar con ellos ("Reflexive" passive/Pasiva refleja).

So, as I said at the beginning, it can have similar meaning: if you can check this is because this can be checked. But it's not the best translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

When is the normal passive used and when is the reflexive passive used? Or is it that they are optional and alternative ways to convey the same meaning?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

They are basically two alternative ways to say the same, as you said.

I would say that we are more used to hear and use the "pasiva refleja" than normal passive (at least in Spain), although I'm not really sure because sometimes impersonal sentences are very similar to "pasiva refleja" (both use "se" and verbs in third person conjugation for example) and most of the people mix up one with the other.

But both sound OK and completely natural when used, so don't worry too much for them. If you have problems with "pasiva refleja" and you really need to use a pasive sentence (active voice sentences are much more common) use "normal" type instead of "pasiva refleja".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stocker65

I tried probar but dl didn't like it, perhaps not a good translation. Don't know

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

I wouldn't say "probar" as a good translation for "to check", not just in this example but in any situation.

Maybe you were trying to use "comprobar". If it is the case then you were right. "Comprobar" means "to check". "Probar" y "comprobar" are similar in writing but not in meaning, the same as "give" and "forgive" in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stocker65

Thanks a lot, this means a lot!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I had problems translating "probar" correctly in the sentence Proba la sopa, which DL translated as "Taste the soup." I then looked it up, and the meaning I found that I thought was most accurate was "test." I had been trying to translate it as "to try" and "to prove." In the same vein, I looked up probar again right now in a different source, and "try out" was another meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

Well, the verb "probar" has many meanings. As you have said, the most common is "to test", but it also means "to taste", "to try" and in a few situations "to prove" (although "to prove" is usually translated as "demostrar").

Probar basically means "to try something for the first time" so you can then know if you like it or if you are good a it, etc. So the meaning is not exactly "to try". You can try something a lot of times but you usually "test" something just once.

When talking about food and drinks, "probar" means "to taste". You try a little piece of that food to know if you like it or if it is hot or cold, for example.

It is an irregular verb although not as difficult as "ir". It is only irregular in the three singular forms of the present simple (in both indicative and subjunctive):

http://conjugador.reverso.net/conjugacion-espanol-verbo-probar.html

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

"This you can check with them" is a fine sentence under certain circumstances. For example while pointing to a piece of luggage.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

Anyway, I'm fairly certain chequear is sometimes Spanglish (or so I've been told.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

No, you're misunderstanding the term Spanglish. Chequear is a anglicism (from Ti Check), that's a word from English that is imported to another language having a similar meaning in both languages. On the other hand, Spanglish refers to a conversation which is made using both Spanish and English words all the time. This is really unusual in most of Spanish speaking countries, it could be more common in countries that are nearly the USA.

So, to sum up. Chequear is a Spanish word with an English origin. Spanglish is mixing Spanish and English in a sentence or a conversation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

Not the way my spouse used it. Any time he heard an English word where a Spanish word already existed he'd claim it was Spanglish. He was Chileno and perhaps a bit of a language snob. LOL

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Beez
Dr.Beez
  • 24
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5

Chileans? Language snobs? Considering how non-standard their version of Spanish is, there is a bit of the pot calling the kettle black in such an attitude...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Did you mean "To check?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph297228
Joseph297228
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 17
  • 7
  • 134

What's wrong with "Tu lo puedes chequear con ellos"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The "tu" is unnecessary but not wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

Can we use consigo instead of con ellos?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

Not really, I don't really know why. "Consigo" isn't used as much as "con él/ella/ellos/ellas". "Consigo" has a specific meaning and can only be used as "with her/him/them" in some occasions. Usually it can be replaced by "con él/ella/ellos/ellas" but not the other way around.

I'm not sure but I think it can be used ONLY if the "with..." refers to the subject. I mean, its real meaning is more similar to "her/himself" than "with..."

I can only think in a few situations:

  • He carries the money with him. = Él lleva el dinero consigo.

  • She's talking to herself = Ella habla consigo misma.

  • They left carring the keys with them = Se fueron llevándose las llaves consigo.

It is not used too much, and I would say you can always used the much more common "con él/ella/ellos/ellas" so you can avoid the mistake.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chupacabrasmama

Why is it esto and not este? There's nothing to indicate gender here

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma0044

Jan 2018 I got controlar? Surely that does not mean confirm or check?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahh_bueno
ahh_bueno
  • 25
  • 17
  • 12
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 18

"Controlar" means "to control". It seems instant translation, at least for me. There can be a few situations in which "controlar" could mean "to check", and there are even less situations in which it could be translated as "to confirm".

"To confirm" is translated as "confirmar", which is another instant translation. "To check" could be more difficult to translate: "Comprobar". It also has an instant translation: "Chequear", although this is consider an anglicism.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobbieJenn

today they say puedes tu controlar esto con ellos is correct ---I have not seen the tu (with appropriate accent ) after puedes

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SueMahon

I was given a solution of 'puedes controlar esto con ellos' Seems an odd choice of translation for check in this context

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen630388

I used "esta"instead of "esto" and it was marked as incorrect, despite being one of the options noted when I placed the cursor over the word "this". Thoughts?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lindsey.Roll

Is there a reason why I cannot use 'este' instead of 'esto'

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George188395
George188395
  • 25
  • 23
  • 22
  • 21
  • 19
  • 19
  • 19
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6
  • 6
  • 520

The alernative answer is not possibke with the words allocated as Ustedes is not available

6 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.