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  5. "Den sykkelen er umulig å bru…

"Den sykkelen er umulig å bruke."

Translation:That bike is impossible to use.

August 9, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fouad899633

Can someone please give me an example using (bruke) as (spend).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

å bruke penger = to spend money. e.g. "Jeg bruker mye penger på mat" = "I spend a lot of money on food"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GooseyJen

Am I the only one who can't hear the difference between "og" and "å"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

You shouldn't be able to, they're pronounced exactly the same. Most of the time it is clear which is meant from the context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyCailin

Why is it not "Den sykkel" instead of "Den sykkelen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

Norwegian has double definiteness. When you use 'den'/'det'/'de' (that/those) in front of a noun you also have to put the noun in the definite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juleuh

No idea if it's related to South Park but that sentence reminds me the Wild Wacky action bike : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVfzWpmyXXk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7bubble7

"This" doesnt work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamHelland

This bike=denne sykklen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seventwelve81

"Bruke" sounds like "brukYE" to me. Am I hearing things?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Even after 8 full sentence playbacks, at regular speed, I cannot hear the "L" in "sykkelen". But when I hover/select the word alone it's very clear. 10Sept17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

At regular speed the 'e's are silent so it sounds like sykkln


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaphid

"the bike is impossible to use" is wrong, is it really that big of a difference ? I understand that norwegian grammar makes a big deal out of it, but I find the and that almost interchangeable in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

There are certainly cases in English where they are not interchangeable. For example, you could say 'My bike is easy to use, but that bike is impossible to use' whereas it would be strange to say 'My bike is easy to use, but the bike is impossible to use'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChocolateCactus

I'm with you. Without any context, if there is a single bike sitting there, it makes perfect sense to say "the bike is impossible to use." I think that either should be correct, but I'm just a lowly level 8.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

"The bike is impossible to use" is a legitimate English sentence, but it's not what the Norwegian sentence means. "Sykkelen" = "The bicycle", "Den sykkelen" = "That bicycle". So "The bike is impossible to use" would be "Sykkelen er umulig å bruke"

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