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  5. "Frakken har flere lommer."

"Frakken har flere lommer."

Translation:The coat has several pockets.

August 10, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuffinChips

Wouldn't "many pockets" work? It gave me an error, but I don't see much of a difference between many and several in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emilia.E

No, because there are two different words for ''many'' and ''several''.

mange = many/a lot flere = several/multiple/more

At least that's what I learned from the adjectives used for plural nouns. Hope this helps. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginko-the-grey

What have i got in my pocket?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M5ykG

That's not fair!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svenska1227

What is the difference between "jakke" and "frakk" in Norway?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

A "jakke" is short, usually ending somewhere around your hip area, while a "frakk" or "kåpe" goes past your hips and potentially all the way down to your ankles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svenska1227

So, a regular jacket (like a rain jacket) for everyday would be "jakke?" Like it looks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, while a longer raincoat would be a "regnfrakk".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kgowen

How about "the coat has some pockets"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ravnin

Then you would use the word 'noen' instead of 'flere'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emel566543

Why not "a lot of"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

The best translation of "flere" is always going to be either "several/multiple" or "more".

"A lot of" is a better translation for "mye" or "mange".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/endriking

Several and more are contradictory in english, one is quantity and the other is comparison. Several and many on the other hand makes sense, even though many is a translation of mange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

"flere" has two meanings - one meaning is "several" and the other is "more"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sapphira226093

How can you tell if it means 'several pockets' or 'more pockets'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

Context :) You can't tell from the sentence by itself


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleyzee

from this context i couldn't ://////


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l.u.cas

So are the singular forms "en frakk" and "en lomm?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

"en frakk" and "en lomme". Unfortunately it's impossible to tell from the definite or plural form whether a noun ends with -e in the indefinite singular. Also note that no words in Norwegian end with double m, even if they have a double m once a suffix is added (e.g., "et rom" - "rommet")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heithr

Every time I hear or see lommer I think "lummur" which makes me hungry, as these are the Canadian-Icelandic crepes with fruit and cream filling that my Amma used to make. Now pockets are going to make me hungry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan564480

my translation of flere was "a few", i am not native english, but thats how i heard my wife using it (she is norwegian). "a few" was however not accepted as an answer. anyone can tell me the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

"several" is a larger number than "a few"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan564480

you are correct. maybe i should use my native language for this training. but at least i know now what the difference is in english: a couple = 2 a few = 3-4 several = 4-8 a dozen = 12-14 many= anything above 6-8 but there are great discussions out there about the fluidity between these definitions


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edmund-

A dozen is almost always twelve. For myself a few is usually 3-4, and many/several is anything more than four, generally, but it depends on context. Many has the connotation of "more than usual".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noimnotserious

I used to think Norwegian would be easy....it just gets tougher as I go.

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