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"She seemed beautiful to me."

Translation:Bana güzel göründü.

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MhdSyrwan

What is the role of this part gör(ün)dü ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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It is the verb and means seem or to be seen

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MhdSyrwan

So does the part "ün" convert any verb to passive voice ? or it's just part of a different verb that has a different meaning ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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There are many ways to make the passive voice, and that suffix is sometimes used to make the passive. This is not a case of that though. This is just a verb that happens to resemble the verb "to see" :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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I seriously think it is ("officially") the reflexive form of "görmek", created by adding the "-(V4)n" suffix "-ün".

According to one grammar book, the passive form of a verb like "görmek" (where the verb stem ends in a consonant that is not "l") would usually be formed by adding "-V4l": "görülmek". We can look that up in a dictionary and indeed it means "to be seen".
And the reflexive form is usually created by adding "-(V4)n". That is what we can see here. "Görünmek".

Strictly speaking, the passive meaning would be "to be seen" and the reflexive meaning would be "to see one's own self".

But with an important verb like "to see", I can imagine it easily picking up idiomatic meanings.
And I think "görünmek" might be used interchangeably with "görülmek", in a passive role.
Further complicates the situation that Turkish passive covers more than English passive. It also covers the active intransitive of such verbs as "to break". As in "my glasses broke".

So, all these factors together make it quite plausible that "görünmek" would pick up the meaning of "to seem", "to look like something".

Curiously enough, "seem" also very closely resembles "see". I wonder if it is pure coincidence.

Am I completely wrong here?

(My main source is "Elementary Turkish" by Lewis V. Thomas)

1 year ago