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"The boy does not like the seagulls."

Translation:Drengen kan ikke lide mågerne.

1
3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

I added a godt. Would that be wrong?

Drengen kann ikke 'godt' lide mågerne.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogProblems
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I'm pretty sure that's wrong. 'Godt' means 'good,' which sounds funny in the sentence.

The boy doesn't like good the seagulls. I believe that's what it would translate to if you added 'godt.'

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

I see. But when it's positive, it sounds fine? "jeg kan godt lide X". That's what Duolingo teaches.

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Reply3 years ago

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Yeah, I think it only works for the positive. IanEvison is probably right in that adding 'godt' to it makes it 'I really like' instead of 'I like.' I don't believe it works in the negative sense of 'I don't like.'

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Got it. No 'godt' in negative. Thank you so much! :-]

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoroteaBrajkovic

I think you could add 'godt' here, but it would change the meaning.

If ' jeg kan godt lide' means ' I can well like' or ' I like it a lot' than my understanding of 'jeg kan ikke godt lide' would be 'I can not well like it' or ' I don't like it a lot/I don't like it that much'

I may be competely wrong, but this is how I see it :)

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanEvison

We need a Dane here. My impression as a very middling student of Danish is that the difference between "han kan lide" and "han kan godt lide" is rather like the difference in English between "I like" and "I really like".

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poulpoul

You are almost correct. As mentioned before, 'godt' means good/well. (adjective/adverb)

E.g. De spiller godt - they play well

Et godt hus - a good house

However, in some instances - on top of my head only when associated with the verbs 'kunne' and 'måtte' - 'godt' implies a confirmation of the statement

e.g. Han kan godt høre it - He DOES hear it/he IS able to hear it

Han kan godt lide mågerne - He DOES like the seaguls

Thus, in these situations, you can often leave out the 'godt' as it is only a slight difference.

In some instances the placement of 'godt', implies a different meaning.

e.g. Han kan godt spille - He CAN play/he knows how to play

or

Han kan spille godt - He can play well

To the first question: it only works with positive sentences

(native Danish speaker)

6
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poulpoul

If you want to say: He really likes the seaguls, you would say

Han kan virkelig godt lide mågerne / Han kan rigtig godt lide mågerne / Han kan meget godt lide mågerne

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanEvison

Thanks for popping in on those of us struggling with your language! Sounds like the "godt" stresses the validity of the statement as in "really, I like it". It does not express the degree to which I like it, as in "I like it a lot".

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Well, here's my take on the "kan ikke lide / kan godt lide" question.

Since the original, core meaning of "lide" is "to suffer" (and, by extension, "endure", "tolerate", etc.), I always think of "jeg kan ikke lide ham" as "I cannot abide him" (in other words, "I don't like him"), whilst "jeg kan godt lide ham", on the other hand, means "I can well abide him": an engagingly litotic way, in my view, of saying "I like him".

Just my to øre's worth... I may be a million miles wide of the mark, but that analysis works for me. But please put it out of your mind if it doesn't for you!

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanEvison

Oh, I do like this theory! And isn't it fun as non-native speakers to elaborate our own theories of this? I have a tutorial session next Tuesday with a real live Dane who also is a language expert and will ask about your theory. The logic of it is great. That because "lide" means suffer, it has a more powerful meaning in the negative that it more "I cannot abide" rather than "I don't like". So, in a way the question we have is about whether "Jeg kan ikke lide" means "I cannot abide".

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Ian, I'm curious to know: did you ever submit my fanciful theory to your real live Dane? And did he perhaps reply in that curious duolingosprog way: "Woot! (< N.B. not Woof! -- that's hundesprog) You're almost correct"?

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Reply2 years ago