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"Volevo passarti a prendere dopo scuola."

Translation:I wanted to come get you after school.

October 22, 2013

93 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olegych76

This is a 'guess what it means' type of sentence. Another one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catygr
  • 1299

'Passare qualcuno a prendere' means to collect someone, especially if it is children from school, or individuals from hospital. But this is possibly an English translation rather than American one. I have been knocked back with ' I was wanting to collect you after school', which should be accepted, especially as it shows the imperfect verb use accurately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ifphigenia

No it's not British English, I think it's Duospeak....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephmitch

My translation was "I wanted to come get you" and it was accepted. To me it sounds the most natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wanhm

Is the sentence acceptable in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

Not in British English. "I wanted to come and fetch you from school" is probably the most natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacko385437

Not at all. British English speakers use "Come and get you" or "Come and pick you up" far more frequently than "fetch" which actually sounds very formal as opposed to natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k8italiana

But we would always put an 'and' in there, not just "come get you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinDocke1

...or come to get you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dev502125

We don't all use the "and" here, informally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont

Report it -- omissions are usually fixed relatively quickly in the Italian tree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrotino

I've sent in several error reports for the smartphone app over the past month. Not one has been corrected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Some of mine take months to get fixed. Be patient, we have new moderators as of September 2014 to help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gordon_gregory

That's my experience too, I've had a whole bunch of them fixed this week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartS1965

neither with me ……… !DL sucks !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tikidog

I'm trying to understand this construction. On first pass, I read this as "I wanted to pass you to take after school" which makes no sense. I think the meaning is something like "I wanted to pass by to take you after school." But then is "ti" associated with "passare" or "prendere"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

And, as you suggest, wouldn't it then be "passare a prenderti", since "you/ti" is the object of the "picking up" and not of the "passing by"....?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiplala

exactly, I had the same and lost a heart. I agree with jgbachand, it sounds more natural to use "passare a prenderti"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

my dictionary has "passare a prendere qualcuno" as to "pick somebody up," it is clear there are loads of expressions using passare , so we just have to get familiar with them. Being monumentally tripped up by this one, I can now remember it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/12Aurora34

Thanks for the info; unfortunately, you're right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

It seems to me that you can probably attach the pronoun to either if it behaves the same way as venire a prendere see http://italian.stackexchange.com/questions/1718/venire-a-prenderti-vs-venirti-a-prendere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

I have had the answer from an Italian who says both passarti and prenderti are acceptable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krokkus

I would say "passare a prenderti" rather than "passarti a prendere"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

krokkus: Me too, but then what do i know, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Ah....such modesty, Prof. ! 08Apr16


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

thanks for raising this tikidog - and others for backing you - I am also puzzled as to why the "ti" isn't attached to prendere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenoblesunfish

In English there is to ask to go and to ask you to go. you is the direct object of to ask, not to go. Here, the verb passare take the direct object (not prendere).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

Not sure i understand you - please say more on passare taking the direct object "ti" and how that might then be translated into english within this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gordon_gregory

The translation is not good in UK English, is it OK in US?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tikidog

"I wanted to come get you after school" is fine in US English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

Really? That sounds awful to my English ears! And I have no idea why "ti" is attached to "passare" and not "prendere".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

haroldwonh,can be either, see refs above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LatecomerLaurie

(American English speaker) I am older, but I don't think it's great English either. I think it's almost a slang or a shorthand. It's really "I wanted to come (and) get you," or more accurately "I wanted to come (to) get you," with the words in parentheses implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenoblesunfish

Yes. I wanted to come to get you after school might be preferable in writing, but the sentence as written is acceptable, especially spoken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judoi49

I think that "come get you" is a phrase that is commonly spoken in the South and it is informally used in other regions of the US; however I don't think it would ever be used in formal writing. One might compare it to the use of "how come" ; one would use "why" when writing a formal letter or paper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesRit3

"I wanted to catch you after school" would be a common expression in middle America. This would be a statement made by someone to a friend indicating that the speaker wanted to meet the other person. I think it should be accepted, especially since the clues for "prendere" include "to catch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

Please - an Italian to the rescue on the possibly stray "ti" issue?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isolaverde

Passare a prenderti: grammaticalmente corretta. Passarti a prendere: è comunemente usato e accettato nella lingua parlata. Stessa cosa per "venire a prenderti / venirti a prendere". I hope it was useful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

isolaverde: Sì, sì moltissimo, grazie!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zseech

Grazie! Chiaro e breve--e utile!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

silkwarrior and kotor 55 see my replies above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rezano_Khaggio

Or, I wanted to fetch you after school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kotor55

Totally confused here: Shouldn't be Volevo pasare a prenderti dopo scuola Any explanation? The sentence doesn't make sense in Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2365

It does; it's called clitic climbing and it's a very common feature of Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

I wish I knew what is meant by a clitic. Is it some term used in American English? I have been learning, using and teaching English grammar for nearly 60 years now, and until starting this Duolingo course, had never heard it, either in relation to my native language, nor when learning French, German, Spanish and Italian. It just seems to mean small or part words - but why this umbrella title is used, when it appears to refer to things (like contractions, indirect objects, or prefixes), I have no idea. Any help, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2365

It's a very common term in linguistics (there's much literature about it), not so much in grammar; in Italian grammar they're called "pronomi atoni" (unstressed pronouns). "Clitic" means exactly that, it's a word that cannot carry any stress, and has to be pronounced together with other words: in English it mostly applies to contractions and the Saxon genitive (you can't say 'm 've or 's without another word). In Italian, contrary to Latin, where e.g. POpulus (the people) became popuLUSque (and the people), clitics can't even alter the word's stress. An unstressable word slips by unnoticed, and it's very convenient to focus the attention on the words you really wish to communicate; think of the difference in focus between "my father's house" and "the house of my father".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marygbaker

Wow! Thank you for this explanation! You are clearly quite an expert and we are lucky to have your explanations!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

Thank you! So it seems a clitic isn't a grammatical term, but merely indicates a part word that is not stressed. I've never studied linguistics, but it seems odd that in none of the languages I have studied, it has never been used. Is it used more in North America, do you know? You make me feel very ignorant: I had never previously encountered the term Saxon genitive for the possessive use of the apostrophe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2365

Ah, that's how it's usually referred to in English teaching in Italy, but naturally many of these terms have no reason to be taught to native speakers... I first met the term clitic in my Ancient Greek classes (they invented the term after all); in my French classes we used the same terms we use in Italian. It seems that in French grammar they're considered the standard pronouns and the stressed ones are called "pronoms disjoints" (disjunctive pronouns). I don't think that the usage varies depending on the variety of English, it probably depends more on the background terminology of the book or teacher. Many resources online seem to treat them as the normal pronouns for Italian as well, and the stressed ones are called "tonic" (direct translation from Italian) or "prepositional" (because they're mostly used after prepositions - makes sense).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Harold: I'm also in the dark and thought it was something anatomical I'd forgotten from my days long ago in high school biology.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KamalAF

Could one say "Volevo passar a prenderti dopo scuola?" instead because that's where you would logically place "ti" in French (or English for that matter).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

karmalaf,and germanlehrerlsu, yes you can, see my replies above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

I thought the same thing, but got it wrong. Logically as an English speaker that's where you'd put it but for some reason Italian attaches it to 'passare'. I can't explain why, so this is simply to let you know you're not alone in thinking this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KamalAF

An Italian friend (native) just told me that "passare a prenderti" is actually better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Wow! Now I feel better about it. Certainly makes more sense and is easier to remember for an english speaker. Thank you -- and your friend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KamalAF

I'm likewise relieved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

I feel the sigh of relief encircling the globe (it has reached England).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaNordin

Sorry, this is off topic, but, is anyone beyond 60% fluency on duolingo? I have been at this point for months.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gianberto

nope - hanging between 58 and 59%... A friend of mine told me that you can get extra's if you start helping to translate texts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaNordin

Thank you gianberto for the info. I have not tried to translate many texts yet. Will do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

I'm stuck on 57% :(. How does one go about helping to translate texts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gianberto

tab 'Immersion' in the menu above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KamalAF

54% but still mid-tree. it slowly increases as you "strengthen skills". naturally 100% fluency in real life is only achieved after significant immersion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Kamal - I've found that daily servings of pasta and chianti help tremendously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaNordin

German.... That's funny! Actually, to translate texts, go to the top of your duolingo page, just to the left of your name and icon. Clic on Immersion. Texts will be there to translate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Linda, Wow, great. that'll give me something to do while I eat my pasta and, well, you know what, which of course could make for some strange translations, which come to think of it, could well be what's behind some of DL's odd translations -- -- Mannaggia! Finalmente so perché.....è a causa del vino! Ciao e grazie ancora una volta!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gianberto

Since a few weeks i have been using that 'strengthen skills' again, but it does not work like it did in the beginning. Now i only get questions taken from the first lesson (starting from above, chronological) that needs restrengthening. When i first started to use DL it worked differently, better. When i restrengthened skills the questions were a mix of all lessons i already finished, which makes more sense. I finished the tree two times, maybe it's because of that? Or is it some preset i have to fix?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B1126

Come get you is not English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KamalAF

It might not be your favorite kind of English in specific contexts, understandably, but it is very much English. Any linguist or anthropologist will explain to you that the standards for what a language is (or is not) are people's actual usage, and the frequency thereof, not some idealized grammar/lexical rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Thanks. By and large I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

B1126: Aha! The fear of all free language users is that one day the dreaded self-righteous language police will come get you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mico_di_Ostia

I think if we had the option of using the phrase "pass by to take you" I might have guessed its meaning but idioms just have to be memorized. No use complainin'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanRankin1

I think this falls into the class of IDIOM.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rama820021

Why does the”ti” attach itself to passer and not prendere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

"to come get you"?? Surely this is not English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John768017

An ugly American-English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wenhama

Crap sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wenhama

Alao in UK we don't say 'come get' always ' come and get'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B1126

please can someone tell me how to report something to DL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve140998

Volevo venire a prenderti dopo la scuola ... Right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/46WtNBhU

Really bad English! Good English would be "I wanted to come and get you after school" Ditto on the comments re the idiomatic phrase. Why don't you present something new in a way that we have a chance of comprehending?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B1126

I wanted to come get you is not English . It is American. English students should not be penalised for writing good translations of a language the Americans have Desecrated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confusedbeetle

B1126 this is a lovely tolerant site. Lets all be nice to each other. Uk english and us english have of course evolved differently. Interestingly americans have retained some words that we have dropped, eg gotten. Neither right nor wrong. I believe duo is american so understandably might miss some of the nuances of uk english, which also varies hugely area to area. Worry less about the English and focus on the Italian. After all this is free. We can all get along and help each other. You are amongst friends


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

I have no objections at all to American English - it's a colourful and expressive language (moreso in some respects than British English), but I do find it a bit galling when a common British English usage which is a valid translation of an Italian sentence is marked wrong by DL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

B1126: Yes it is. It may not be your brand of English and yes, it may be colloquial American English, but it is English all the same and because it's American English in your opinion, is no reason to slam it. Language evolves and just because it's now different, doesn't mean it's inferior. By the way, those American GIs who came to your country's aid in WWII, saving British lives and in the process your beloved language from the Nazis - have you forgiven them yet for desecrating your language?

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