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"These are our heads."

Translation:Is iad seo ár gcinn.

August 12, 2015

10 Comments


[deactivated user]

    It rejects Seo iad ár gcinn.

    A common way to introduce someone to a third party is to say for example Seo í Úna


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DTSFF
    • 1331

    Yes, I believe that this should be accepted too


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacBeatha

    Your suggestion is still being rejected as are Siod iad ár gcinn and Sid iad ár gcinn. This is unfortunate because these structures are actually more common in the present tense in native speech than Is iad seo...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vkigus

    Why is it not "Is ár gcinn iad seo?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Is iad seo ár gcinn is correct in Ulster Irish. In the other dialects, it should be Is iad ár gcinn iad seo, where the first iad is a subcomplement.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DTSFF
    • 1331

    Two years later, but :) Is iad seo ár gcinn. seems the correct way to say it, and not only in Ulster Irish. This was what I answered based on what I had read on GnaG. It's again an example of copular sentence where the subject comes before the predicate because the subject is a demonstrative pronoun.

    edit : The other sentence I was referring to is : Is é an fear sin a múinteoir. (here) In that example, the subject was not a demonstrative pronoun only, but held one, and in that case the subject also comes before the predicate.

    In addition to being explained in the "Exceptions to the PSO rule" (link in the other comment thread), it's explained there, under "wenn das Subjekt ein Demonstrativpronomen ist bzw. führt.".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeinkerry

    The solutions offered by Duo and knowledgeable contributors seem to be at odds, leaving one in the dark.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie91367

    Why not " sin ár gcinn" ? Remember a similar expression in a lesson


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1485

    You could get away with Seo ár gcinn, but Sin ár gcinn would mean "Those are our heads".

    When a part of the Sentence is elided like this (the copula is really there, just not spoken), Duolingo usually only teaches the un-elided form. It's a lot easier to learn to elide something as you get better than it is learn to remove the elision.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie91367

    My mistake :-) Go raibh maith agat

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