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  5. "Drikker han vann i stedet fo…

"Drikker han vann i stedet for øl?"

Translation:Is he drinking water instead of beer?

August 12, 2015

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Beck lager (Beklager)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrOctagonapus

Tbf though beer is expensive in Norway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FilipFilip17

My first thought was “Does he drink water instead of oil?” But then I thought, “Hold on, who drinks oil?” In German oil is Öl, so that’s a false friend.

And as Duo said, “Man drikker ikke olje.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

I like water, why is that a problem for so many people?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grymvold

Why not "i stedet av"? Why "for"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louise_the_Lotus

If you click on the word "for", it means "for" or "of". "I stedet for" "Instead of"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mladenbrankovic

But "av" can mean "of" too, right? Would "i stedet av" be correct or incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"I stedet for" is a fixed expression, but "av" can mean "of" in other cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Am7b5

Is there a way in Norwegian to differentiate between the question 'Is he/she...' and 'Does he/she...'

In English they different things. 'Is' refers more to the current moment, 'Does' refers more to any moment past future or present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aidanjhart

As far as I know context is enough to differentiate between those.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronheiss

Actually, as I understand it anyway, English is an exception there: most Indo-European languages (and I'm pretty certain all Germanic languages) don't make any grammatical distinction between "is s/he" and "does s/he", relying on context or emphasis alone to differentiate between the two meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NorwayLover

Is it constructed the same way as the French "À la place de" ( ~ at the place of ) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, or rather "in the place of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline-G.

I don't know about him, but that's what I would do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aarghthebees

What is the difference between "i stedet for" and "istedenfor"? Are they not interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

They're synonymous, but not interchangeable for listening exercises.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arkilaeus

For the phrase "i stedet for", why is "in the place of" not accepted? Isn't that a direct translation AND doesn't it make sense in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

It's ok, but it's an uncommon way of saying it and doesn't sound very natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan743629

This kind of behavior is truly unacceptable!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoctorWho01

At first I thought: "Is he drinking water instead of oil? Whaat?! Duo, again a handful phrase?" Then I remembered it's my French with "huile", which is "oil".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jewelsonn

How does one say "Does is drink water instead of beer?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline-G.

That's not a grammatical sentence. "Drink water instead of beer" is "Drikker vann i stedet for øl" but that's the best I can do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amin663889

I understand "Drink water instead of beer" as an imperative sentence, so it should be said as "Drikk vann i stedet for øl".

But "You/They drink water instead of beer" will be translated to "Du/De drikker vann i stedet for øl".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David554380

He drinks is present tense. It is the same as, he is drinking. Why wasn't it accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amin663889

I think it would be accepted if you had written: "Does he drink water instead of beer?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JBass14

Good going buddy! Beer is liquid bread


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangochutney

Is it possible to have: "He drinks water instead of beer?" Just tried and it was incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrzemekWic

That's not how you build the question...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangochutney

It could be, couldn't it? On a more general timescale? For example, in the middle ages when water couldn't be trusted so everyone drank beer, it would be a legitimate, surprised-sounding question about someone who drinks water instead of beer. I.e:

-"Did you know John only drinks water. Never beer."

-"He drinks water instead of beer!!???"

Is this how that question would be phrased in Norwegian? Because if so it should really be an accepted translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lqvaughn

I think the point is that the way you worded it, it is only a question because of the inflection in your voice. This is fine in english but I think in Norwegian the verb HAS to come before the subject for it to be a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's not that you can't use inflection in the same way in Norwegian, but rather that translation here on Duo is written rather than spoken; you can't rely on inflection that isn't present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lolgast

While I'm definitely not an expert on Norwegian, I would presume this would work the same way in Norwegian as in English (and Dutch for that matter, which is in some ways quite similar to Norwegian): You don't change the sentence at all, but use intonation to indicate that you're surprised and/or expecting an answer, so

"Han drikker vann i stedet for øl?"

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