https://www.duolingo.com/rhyslop

What needs to happen before a language gets its immersion tab?

I signed up for duolingo french, not to learn it (well, maybe to refresh it a bit, but I already know the language) but to see how the immersion feature works.

As near as I can tell, users (and probably paying customers) can upload documents in the lesson language, and the users translate them sentence by sentence to the starting language. It doesn't appear to need lesson preparation work the way the lessons do, and the program structure to support it is already there.

What is keeping the dutch course from getting immersion? Is there some background stuff that a regular user can't see that's behind it, that dutch doesn't have set up yet?

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ketoacidosis
ketoacidosis
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In Luis' TEDTalk from shortly before Duolingo was released, Immersion was one of the ways that Duolingo seemed to be planning to generate revenue, which is not very surprising if you take a look at the previous work Mr. von Ahn has done in crowdsourcing.

More recently, in previous interviews, Duolingo has said that they have moved away from Immersion and towards affordable language proficiency tests as a means of revenue. I don't think that any course that has been released from the Incubator (where new courses are made) has the Immersion feature. I think it is only available to the original courses that were released.

I haven't heard anything about Immersion becoming available for courses that don't have it yet. Another point to bring up: I'm not sure if this is still the case, but I think the only sponsored articles were with translations from English, and not to English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhyslop

I saw that talk, that's how I found out about DuoLingo :)

Kind of sad if they're moving away from Immersion. I've been having fun the last few days with it. I'm not interested in paying for a proficiency test, but I'm perfectly happy to practice my language skills with non-lesson paragraphs and texts, even if duo is making money from my work. I'm not looking for a certificate saying I'm proficient, I'm looking to be able to read and write and speak and understand dutch so I can talk to my relatives, using normal, non-lesson sentences!

(The sentences in the lessons are fantastically memorable in their silliness, but it's not what people say, or write in an article or story.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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For Dutch, the only "immersion" option here on Duolingo is found in the "reverse" course - English for Dutch speakers.

That's a greater challenge for those of us starting from English. But it's an option.

Other options can be found outside Duolingo. There are several sites for chat and translation help. And on news and video sites, you can find fresh content in Dutch each day. (There are already several threads here about those, so I'm not going to list those.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhyslop

English from Dutch has immersion? I'll have to look into that once I get a bit farther along with my understanding. I've bookmarked a couple of dutch news sites aimed at kids but still struggle with that reading level.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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Starting with English and translating into Dutch is a lot harder for us native English speakers than going from Dutch to English.

I know I'm going to make a LOT of mistakes.

But the challenge awaits.

-- The kids news site is a good idea. I've done a bit of that, but probably ought to do more.

A Google search for "nederlands nieuws voor kinderen" turned up quite a few sites.

3 years ago
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