"You are still very young, you will change."

Translation:Henüz çok gençsin, değişeceksin.

August 12, 2015

16 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blablache

Sorry if it's already been explained somewhere, but when are hala and henüz used? I remember being marked wrong once for using henüz instead of hala, and concluded henüz only meant "still" in a negative sentence, which is apparently wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Hâlâ = "still"

Hâlâ Ankara'dayım. = I'm still in Ankara.

Hâlâ Ankara'da değilim. = I'm still not in Ankara.


Henüz = "just now" (in positive sentences; requires a past tense) - this usage is somewhat uncommon. ;

Henüz = "for now" (with adjectives) - which is the case here

Henüz = "not yet" (in negative sentences)

Henüz başladım. = I've just started.

Henüz başlamadım. = I haven't started yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blablache

Thanks a lot, I think I get it now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcinM85

But in the sentence This glass is still dirty only hala is accepted, not henüz. Why? It is also with an adjective like here. Is it so because being young is something that will change, while a glass being dirty is something that may never change?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BabaJim

What is the difference between degistireceksin and degiseceksin? (I do not have a Turkish alphabet keyboard for the "s" and "g" in the above)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Değişeceksin = you will change. Like you will become something else. It's you who's going to change.

Değiştireceksin = you will change it. Something will change because of you.

Linguistically, değişmek is intransitive; değiştirmek is transitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaElenaBencos

Why not "degistireceksin"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Li.Va.
  • 1120

There is an explanation above, maybe it can help:

"Değişeceksin = you will change. Like you will become something else. It's you who's going to change.

Değiştireceksin = you will change it. Something will change because of you.

Linguistically, değişmek is intransitive; değiştirmek is transitive."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dovahfluun

So, what does "büyükeklemeyinzatensıfatlardavar" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ex_contributor

just ignore it, we are aware of this issue


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karen4Turkey

Lütfen explain why çok gençsin here and not sen çok genç?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie_goforit

Hi Karen,
in Turkish you will find the verb (normally) at the end of a sentence. That's the way it's here in the first phrase. In Turkish there is no verb for "are". The marker for the verb is the suffix sin at gençsin. So you know it is "you are".

If you write "sen çok genç" this really seems to sound right in an English speaking ear. In Turkish, however, there is missing the verb for the subject "you". Sen at the beginning does not indicate the person here.

"çok genç" can be translated as he (or she / it) is very young.
"o çok genç" is an alternative in this case. [so "sen çok genç" is something like "you is young"]

You may write "sen çok gençsin" with the "sen" being optional (e.g. if you want to stress it).

gençim = I am young
gençsin = you are young
genç = he is young (also: they are young = onlar genç)
gençimiz = we are young (not totally sure about this form)
gençiniz = you are young (not totally sure)
genç(ler) = they are young


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrdlgz69

you should change the verb genç should be ''gençsin'' the sentence can be ''sen henüz çok gençsin, sen değişeceksin'' or you can remove the subject ''henüz çok gençsin,değişeceksin''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

In another sentence I used "henüz" for "still" and it was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BahaHijazi

So are genç and küçük interchangeable? Because they same appeared to me with this same English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Driekie8

I am confused. To me henüz translates to YET and hala is still..

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