https://www.duolingo.com/Susanna35

Reverse Italian Tree

Susanna35
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I finally finished the reverse tree. I made a lot of mistakes, and still have a lot to learn about some constructs. I will go through it again in the same ways that I did with the original Italian tree. I decided not to worry too much about the things I still don't understand. I kept grasping more and more, and if I don't try to rush it, they will come eventually. Although I might purchase a more comprehensive grammar book, if I know just what to look for. Amazon.com keeps recommending "Practice Makes Perfect: Complete Italian Grammar" by Marcel Danesi. Anyone familiar with this? Is it really "complete?" Would it be worth my while to spend the money on it?

3 anni fa

8 commenti


https://www.duolingo.com/Louiswu15
Louiswu15
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I'm not familiar with "Practise", but I would recommend " English Grammer for Students of Italian" by Sergio Adorni and "Soluzioni" by Denise De Rome. Congrazione, by the way.

3 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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If you live in the US, go to the bookstore and see if they have it and flip through it. I have one in the practice makes perfect series just for Spanish verb tenses and it's pretty good so far. I think they have a book for over all learning, one for grammar, one for verbs, probably one for whatever else. If you can find it cheap online, I say go for it. I have the Baron's one and it is good for reference. It has exercises but for me, the format of the book makes it not as easy to learn if you're trying to teach yourself from it. But at the same time if you're using it as a reference it's really good. The practice makes perfect seems to integrate exercises pretty well. But it may depend on the author of the particular book. I would check Amazon for reviews.

3 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanna35
Susanna35
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Thanks for all the comments and recommendations.

I have an idea of my own that I think would be a better way to learn a language than the way duolingo does it. Duolingo uses topics and constructs, and then tries to teach you a host of words that are withing those constructs. My idea would be to start with simple sentences and phrases, and, instead of having them within a single construct, teach all the constructs surrounding that word. For instance, you have a verb presented in the present tense, but you also have that same verb used in the past tense, the future tense, etc. Then, when you have new words that follow the same pattern, you have already learned that - you are just learning new vocabulary. Of course, you wouldn't get everything in one lesson, but I think that would work better, instead of trying to throw all the words within a single construct - like present, past, etc. in verbs, like adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, etc. Because you often use several of these constructs in a single sentence, it makes more sense; otherwise you may as well just list the words (well, not really quite that simple). But I find that many of the mistakes I make are not under the topic of the unit I am in. I know Duolingo is limited, and it is free, so I can't complain too much, and I have learned a lot.

3 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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I think I understand what you are saying. Basically making your own duolingo-ish method but grouped differently. I think you may like a verb drill book. I know part of what slowed me down in the beginning was realizing that the reason I couldn't read anything was because I didn't know all the verb tenses. Now that I've learned them (mainly through duo) things are easier. I just need to add vocabulary.

Let us know how it works out. I've been looking up stuff on the brain and language learning to see if I can help my learning process somehow. Trying to see how I can learn faster.

3 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/dhunteroz
dhunteroz
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You might find what your after here "https://quizlet.com/subject/duolingo/".

But in regards to the way duolingo teaches, it is optimal because by its approach it only has to introduce one word at a time and can have more interesting sentences, this maximises the chance you'll get the right answer right away and therefore learn each word quickly.

Keep in mind Duolingo will only cover about 80% of the language (at least in the normal tree) I don't how much the reverse tree would add (it probably mostly improves your understanding of the 80% you know). The easiest method after duolingo is probably reading and TV . You can read almost anything knowing 8/10 words and understand TV. Obviously speaking with natives can help but in terms of increasing vocabulary both tv/reading I think is important.

For a grammer book I can suggest "Modern Italian Grammar: A Practical Guide", I find it quite useful.

Congrats btw on completing your two trees!

3 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanna35
Susanna35
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Thanks!

3 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanna35
Susanna35
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I see that the book that I mentioned has a new edition coming out in May. I wonder if I should wait for that?

3 anni fa
Impara Inglese in soli 5 minuti al giorno. Gratis.