https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa

Cultural differences , a curiosity from Brazil.

aanaaaa
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Here in Brazil we do something different from other parts of the world, we eat avocado with sugar, we make a smoothie with avocado too... When I heard that some people eat it with salt I couldn't believe hahahahaha, some people here like it, but it is not common.
Tell me something that is different in your country :)

3 years ago

91 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Seanchai35

In the town I was born in, in Michigan, USA, we have a "party snack" that everyone makes. They're called "Polish roses" (like Poland, the country) and they're made with slices of beef spread with cream cheese, that get wrapped around a whole green onion. (When you've finished wrapping them, they look like rosebuds with long green stems).

They're such a common food at parties, celebrations, funerals etc that for most of my life, I thought they were an American thing, or maybe just a Michigan thing... it wasn't until I started talking about it to a friend from the town next to mine and realized she had no idea what I meant, that I researched it and realized it's something that only people in my hometown make.

I think more people are discovering it now, thanks to the internet. I'm sure it has made their party food better and their breath much more onion-y. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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We make the same thing, except using Danish ham.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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That sounds really good. May have to try that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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You eat it with sugar? That's crazy!

I can only think of one thing similar in my experience; if you go to France, and you want tea or coffee with milk, you have to ask for tea and coffee with milk, but in England, if you want tea or coffee without milk, you have to stop them pouring it in before it is too late, people look at you like you are crazy, and you have to spend ten minutes explaining that it is fine, you prefer it that way...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Yeah we eat with sugar hahahaha, we take out the lump, put sugar and eat it , I think other people are crazy , I can't imagine it with salt hahahha , but I heard some people make some kind of salad here, my mother says it is true but I never see... I like with sugar :P . Here when you buy your coffee you say how you want and they do it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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Avocado and salt?

That's the famous Mexican "Guacamole". It's delicious (yeah, I thought it was crazy too, before tasting it, yum) - It gets tomatoes and other stuff too.

I suddenly realized I just love avocados whatever way you prepare them.

I usually make my smoothies with oath and banana too. Everyone looks at me as if I were an alien >:-)

(Oath and banana is a standard smotthie. Avocado is another standard smothie, but try them together and you become a monster haha)

I also like mixing "açaí" with "avocado". That's how you make "açaí" perfect!
(Yes, you can frown at me, I'm used to it).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Cobb salad is popular here in the States, where (unsweetened) avocado is one of its key ingredients. (If you’d like to try making it for yourself according to that recipe, a teaspoon is about 5 ml, a tablespoon is about 15 ml, and a cup is about 240 ml.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Oh I saw, but I can't imagine avocado with salt hahaha, I don't like salads very much, only tomatoes ( I love them) and some lettuce sometimes ... And only with salt ... Or I like to eat with a banana, yeah it is another thing from brasilians , many people like to eat food each a banana ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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As an Englishman, I've been given odd looks for putting vinegar on chips / fries when in mainland Europe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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As an American who just moved back to the US after 5 years in the UK, I will miss proper British chips with vinegar. This is a really delicious thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Yuck! , I hope this is the word for "eca"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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Yes :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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Oh my God vinager is so delicious... When I was four I used to drink the stuff, how is that for an early childhood memory :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CuriousAtanaa

It leaves me staring in horror quite frankly, I detest the smell and hate even a hint in cooking . . . but each to their own.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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I would give you an odd look for that too hahahahha

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thakelo
Thakelo
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I'm from Chile and we eat lots of avocado. It's one of my favourite kinds of food; for salad, sandwiches or alone. Salt intensifies the flavour like 10x times! It's amazing. The first time I heard Brazilians ate it with sugar I decided to give it a try. It tasted so boring and weird! I will never do it again. Please give it a try (with salt) and let me know if you like it :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berg123

In the U.S popcorn is eaten with salt and in Germany it's eaten with sugar. French fries are usually eaten with ketchup in the U.S but in Germany it's eaten with mayonnaise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Oh here we have popcorn with salt and the red ones with sugar , they are very good both ways, french fries with ketchup is the most common here ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Well we have the ones with sugar that are not red too ... look at some photos :

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trogonidae
Trogonidae
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Red popcorn? That looks odd and delicious at the same time haha.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Oh they are delicious , the red ones are common popcorn, but they put this red thing on them and sugar :) ... the second photo are the ones which come in a sac , they are sweet and crunchy...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot
Abendbrot
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What is the red stuff? Does the red stuff have any taste?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Yes it has a taste, a good taste, do you know that apples with are like that, we call here "maçã do amor" ,

It is the same thing that they put on the popcorn

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trogonidae
Trogonidae
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Ah, so the red thing has a sweet taste? It looks very delicious. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soedori
soedori
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Strange, I always had my fries with mayo and mustard. I always hated ketchup.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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In US we mainly eat popcorn with salt, but we also eat with sugar too: Kettle corn, cracker jacks, PoppyCock, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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For me an avocado smoothie is not different. I'm American and I have made plenty of avocado-strawberry-banana smoothies, or avocado cream and chocolate smoothies. All sweetened with honey (with a little lemon juice in the all fruit one). I've even made avocado ice cream a couple of times. I don't eat it by itself with sugar or salt, but I'm not surprised by salt. Have you forgotten about guacamole? That is savory not sweet. I also like to put it on turkey bacon sandwich. This is making me hungry.

As for something different... I don't eat it, but maybe pig ear sandwich or pickled pigs feet. (I'm from down south and have never tried either of these. Just can't get my brain to accept it. It looks just like what it is. Why I can eat a leg of something but not an ear or foot, I don't know, but I just can't.) I think pig ear is rare here. Probably would find it more in the past with my parents' generation.

Even within the United States, people that are not from the southern states find Sweet Tea, grits, and fried okra unusual, so there you go. That's all I can think of.

Sweet Tea is brewed tea sweetened very well. It is very sweet. This is NOT ice tea. You cannot order it in restaurants outside the southern states.They just don't make it. Very disappointing when traveling to a far away state :) but most southerners know how to make it themselves.

I think you may know what grits are, and fried okra is breaded/battered sliced pieces of okra fried and then salted. Is anyone else hungry now?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IceAly
IceAly
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For the most part, the only Southern food I really miss is fried green tomatoes. I love fried green tomatoes! My grandmother used to make them for me every summer, and they were a common appetizer in local (non-chain) restaurants. Mostly, when I mention green tomatoes to people outside of the American South, they look at me like I'm crazy.

As for avocados, I've never heard of them being eaten with just sugar or just salt. I always just ate them plain if I wanted to just snack on them. I've had them in sweet and savory recipes, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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It's funny how we don't know what's different until we go way out town. Like the sweet tea thing. I already knew not to ask, but I was visiting family in New Mexico and forgot what state I was in and asked for sweet tea at the restaurant we went to. Of course they didn't have anything even remotely close to that, and I was reminded of where I was visiting. :) I've never gotten a crazy look, but often an almost confused look before saying they have ice tea or some other type of tea.

Well, I don't really like fried green tomatoes, but then I'm not that much of a tomato person. But my mom loves fried green tomatoes like you. And I can't imagine eating an avocado with nothing with it. That is just not happening for me. That is great though that you can do that. It is very healthy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IceAly
IceAly
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Both my mom and my grandmother had an extensive tomato garden. My whole family loves tomatoes, and fried green tomatoes were a natural consequence of not wanting to wait for them to ripen.

Another thing I just thought of is strawberry shortcake. In the south, strawberry shortcake was a sweet biscuit-like cake with strawberries. My mother had a strawberry garden right next to the tomato garden, and strawberry shortcake was a huge part of my childhood. I live in California now, and every so-called "strawberry shortcake" I've had since moving out here has been some other kind of cake: angel food cake, pound cake, or just normal white cake (with strawberries, obviously). I should know this by now, but to this day, I get excited whenever I see strawberry shortcake on a menu. Then, I get disappointed when I see it on a plate. (sigh) Have you experienced this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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No, I've never really had the biscuit-like version. I think I tried the recipe for something similar that's on the side of a Bisquick box and i'm sure that's nowhere near as good as what you're talking about. (I don't remember liking it. Probably because I don't really like Bisquick.) But I have had the experience of ordering cornbread at a BBQ restaurant in Boston that claimed to have southern food, and it was horrible. It was extremely sweet like they tried to make a cupcake or something and went past that. There are certain things you just can't rely on from restaurants even when it's down south (like grits). I hope you know how to make it yourself so you can still enjoy it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seanchai35

Wasn't hungry till you said fried okra... I live in Georgia now and fried okra is the one southern delicacy that has permeated my Michigander mind - I take my tea hot and with milk, call Coke pop, can't stand grits or biscuits and gravy, etc, but fried okra.... mmm. Too late at night to pick some fresh okra in my garden now, but guess what I'll be doing tomorrow?

(And yes, Polish roses are excellent. Give them a try sometime - they're particularly handy when you realize you're having guests over or going to a pot luck and you don't have time to cook any snack food; which I'm betting is at least part of how they originated.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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I don't eat gravy with biscuits(yuck), but if you had a really good fluffy flaky buttery biscuit you may change your mind about them. Grits, that's another hard one to find cooked well, but good if you find it. They should be kinda creamy and buttery and soft. Restaurant grits are never right. We've got okra going in the back yard too. The hard part is waiting for more to ripen after you've picked some!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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:P No , I am not hungry cause I don't like these things you named hahahha
Some crazy people here like okra, but I don't, and most of people love "feijoada" is black beans with pork , they like to put the ears and feet in this dish too , I don't know how people like it hahahha , but the problem is me I think ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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Lol well that's why it's great that there is so many different things to choose from when it comes to food.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmareloTiago
AmareloTiago
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It is difficult to know what combinations of food are considered odd in other parts of the world. Sometimes we put salt on watermelon. Chili powder on other fruits or vegetables? Maple syrup in my coffee? I also make my own home-made sauerkraut.

I come from a part of Texas where most meals involve some kind of beef - hamburgers, steaks, barbeque or what have you. We consider chicken to be a vegetable. One of the few good ones!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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hahahahahah chicken a vegetable? hahahhaah oh God ... salt on the watermelon? never, it comes perfect , just eat it :P ... Some people here like lemon with salt ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/writchie4
writchie4
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Honestly, you should give salted watermelon a chance. Not too much, just a light sprinkle to bring out the flavor. It's fantastic (and even better if the person that bought it didn't thump 'em right at the store and ended up with one that's not very sweet).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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My family puts a slight sprinkle of salt on cantaloupe. We eat it both plain and with salt. I've tried salt on watermelon once or twice, but I prefer it saltless.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot
Abendbrot
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I think it tastes very well in case the person who eats it needs salt.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
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Fresh Guacamole and chips. Unbeatable!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slydiad
Slydiad
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I'm from the US, so I'm not sure how widespread this is, but several people from other countries have told me over the years that pumpkin pie is strange to them and very much an acquired taste that you're not likely to acquire if you grow up outside the US (& maybe Canada).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Pumpkin pie is not strange here but I don't like yuck hahhaah , but I don't like a lot of thinks ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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Never heard about pumpkin pies here....which part of Brazil are you from???

By the way, nothing more delicious than a gorgeous carrot cake covered in melted chocolate!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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I am from São Paulo , my mother likes pumpkin pie. I don't see many people doing it, but is not strange...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niki250

In my country Serbia we don't have avocado at all. I've never tried it. Most exotic fruits in my country are bananas and oranges. We make lots of jams of our fruit. We also make 'sweet' and that's traditional. When somebody comes as a guest they are served with 'sweet' and water. Most common fruits for 'sweet' are cherry, forest strawberry and quince. Plum and pear are used for making a traditional alcoholic drink called 'rakija'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Oh, I feel sad for you now :/ , here in brazil we have many kinds of fruits, until the exotic ones from other countries are possible to buy :/ , so many flavors and colors , we cultivate most of them, so they are not expensive , we can eat fruits everyday , we have many kinds of vegetables too, but I only like potatoes hahahaha , come to Brazil , you are going to get crazy with all kinds of food .... Here in São Paulo we have restaurants from all over the world too ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niki250

We have fruits but not that exotic as you do.I will love to come to Brazil! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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There are even a whole lot of fruit Brazilians themselves don't know! Those who live in big cities don't know half of them!

Once I went to the center region and tasted dozens of different tastes, fantastic

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trogonidae
Trogonidae
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Brazil sounds like an amazing place to visit! If only I knew Portuguese; I'd love to study there. It's cheaper than here in the US. Like, by a lot, haha.

It's sometimes like that in México too. There's a whole lot of vegetables and fruit that people use, especially in the central region which has a lot of indigenous inspiration. Whenever I visit family, I absolutely love to eat mango with a topping called tajín and hot sauce, like someone already posted. Tamarindo (don't know what it is in English) is also really good but I don't know how common it is in other countries.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Nopales (prickly pear cactus pads) peeled and sauteed or raw with lemon juice. Pieces of barrel cactus covered with sugar as a candy. Elote (green corn or corn on the cob) cocktail - corn roasted, cut off the cob, then mixed with queso fresco, chile, lime and salt. The best is with green field corn, instead of sweet corn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanka_ps
Ivanka_ps
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Se me hizo agua la boca!! We prepare corn cocktail here, too, we call it "esquite" it varies from region to region. I specially like tostiesquite (esquite with tostitos).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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In the South of Brazil (specifically in Rio Grande do Sul), you have "chimarrão", which is a very hot tea inside a big cup entirely filled with herb that you keep refilling water and drinking from some kind of metalic straw called "bomba".

You must pass it to the others in your group and everyone must drink from that same cup (cuia). That's how they atest friendship.

It's common in Argentina too, but I don't know if the procedures are the same.

Chimarrão picture

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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South Asia (India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan) is totally diffferent from the western cultures. So where do I start? I'm from India. I'll tell you something very common. In India, we have the head shake, where some particular ways tell about the person's answer. A nod (up, down, up...) means yes, (left, right, left...) means no, your chin doing the (right, left, right...) movement with your head doing the opposite means yes or okay.

One never eats with his/her left hand (first of all, obviously we eat with our hands), as it is used for 'hygiene' work; if you know what I mean ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berg123

I guess I would get some strange looks in your country as I'm left handed...lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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I was imagining it, some people are left handed ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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Hehe. Maybe. But no one really cares. It's rather considered a preference, not a necessity. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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I eat with both hands hahahahha , it would be a problem hahahahah

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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No, obviously it's "preferred" to eat with both the hands. :) And obviously we have our breaks which we need to.. Well tear to take out pieces (did that make sense?), so we need both the hands. But the main work is done with the right. Oh god I don't know what I'm saying XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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A small note on your English. Eu sei o que vc queria dizer com 'vitamin', mas em inglês só existe no sentido de 'vitamina C'. O que vc quiser é 'smoothie' :) And I had no idea Brazil did avocado smoothies. That is super exotic. I've been a few times, but never noticed that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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Thank you, I did wonder what 'vitamin' really meant, though I had a guess :)

Although now that you have changed it, no one else will know, haha!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Oh thanks ,I will corect it :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

We have avocado smoothies in California, but that is less common than other flavors.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianofPeace

In the US most people eat it with salt or mixed with something.

I've been interested in Brazil a lot lately so that's another cool thing to know. Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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In the United States we tend to drink water and soda with ice, which I've heard is uncommon in other parts of the world.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Really? Here we drink with ice if something is not cold , but just cold from the refrigerator is better ... Water I prefer it natural but when the weather is hot , it must be cold :) , nobody likes hot soda, I mean not "hot" is the way we say when it is not cold here for sodas .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pretzelle

I'm from California. We also eat avocado with sugar but not that much. It also gets made into a smoothie here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivanka_ps
Ivanka_ps
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In Mexico, we add chilli powder, spicy salsa, chamoy or even lemon juice to fruits and veggies. In my region, we like eating sliced fruit and veggies (like mango, watermelon, pineapple, orange, jícama and cucumber) with a commercial fruit seasoning called Tajín.

In the case of avocado, we eat it a lot! sliced or mashed (guacamole). A guacamole can be as simple as a mashed avocado with salt and lemon juice, but it can also have minced tomatoes, onion, coriander and chilli.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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This is really good, in case you haven't tried it. In the US, it's available in Mexican grocery stores and in most stores in areas with a large Mexican population. Also, a wedge of lime is automatically served with almost EVERYTHING in many restaurants here in Tucson.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Don_Cristian
Don_Cristian
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Well in my country it's normal to be naked in the sauna, even with boys and girls mixed, which is common in my friend group and in some families but not in everyone's. One American friend of mine was already shocked to hear that guys are together naked in sauna, he said that only homosexual and old people do this in USA.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_pinkodoug_
_pinkodoug_
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People in the US are generally very prudish when it comes to nudity and sexuality. This results in situations like this being perceived as sexual in some way when they're not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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hahahahahahaha, no, here you can't do that , it seems to be something sexual , men here can't see naked women and stay normal hahahhaha , no way , but it is ok girls change clothes in front other girls and boys do the same , some restrooms here are like that , without that part to separate and there is no problem , the problem is put men and women together hahahaa is a big tabu ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Peanut butter- Many people from other countries consider it horrible but it's popular here.

Sweet tea- In my part of the country, we have iced tea that is unsweetened. In the South, it comes very, very sweet and you have to ask for unsweet tea.

Avocado - I had a Swedish friend that thought that avocado tasted like soap.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/writchie4
writchie4
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Sweet tea- In my part of the country, we have iced tea that is unsweetened. In the South, it comes very, very sweet and you have to ask for unsweet tea.

Just as God intended it. Unsweetened tea is a tragedy, but for some reason it still exists.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_pinkodoug_
_pinkodoug_
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I've lived in the south for nearly 40 years, but I still can't drink sweet tea. The first time I ate at a restaurant down here and asked for iced tea, I was traumatized by the brownish sugar water I was served instead.

cGlua29kb3Vn

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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Yes. Just as God intended.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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I saw on tv the guy who travels and tries all the strange food all over the world (I can't remember his name) giving kids in Brazil?(somewhere in SA) some peanut butter to try for the first time and they did NOT like it. Maybe should have tried a different brand!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
Mod
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Here we expect peanut butters to be sweet, and they aren't!!! (I just tasted one this week....salty?.... so boring hahah)

All peanut foods we make (except baked peanuts themselves) get sugar. "Paçoca" and "pé-de-moleque" are the most common.

  • Paçoca is a pressed peanut powder with sugar and sometimes corn powder too (fubá is the name of corn powder, not startch though, what do you call it?)
  • Pé-de-moleque is a lot of peanuts covered in a hard block of "rapadura" (solid sugar from sugar canes almost without any treatment)

There is also "cajuzinho" (which has the name of a fruit, but has nothing to do with "cashew"). It's also a candy from peanuts.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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That's interesting. Most peanut butter in the US is sweetened, unless it's nowhere near as sweet as what you are used to where you are from. But then we usually add a sweet element to it. for example Peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Usually with grape jelly or strawberry jelly. I tend to buy peanut butter with just salt and add honey to it with whatever I am making. And I like banana strawberry peanut butter smoothies. Also a dessert can be chunky peanut butter, sliced bananas, whipped cream and chocolate drizzled with honey which is good. Oh, add some strawberries. You get the idea. But then you have savory like with Asian peanut sauces. Spicy and nutty

Your Pé-de-moleque sounds similar to what we call "peanut brittle"

Paçoca, maybe you mean corn flour? since you say its not corn starch

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
Mod
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Peanut brittles, that's what they are :)

And yes, corn flour too. (But not all paçocas have that).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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We have iced tea that comes in a can like this :

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaaaa
aanaaaa
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Or we can put ice in the tea no problem :). Tea without sugar is terrible ....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j.l.h

I'm American and live in the southern region of the country -fried okra, fried pickles (something I haven't tried because I like my pickles cold), fish or shrimp and grits, collard greens (boiled with pork), sweet potato pie with marshmallows. I don't know how many other places regularly have boiled peanuts - they are so salty but so tasty.

If you want to get into something interesting, just talk about barbecue sauces with southerners. There are a few types and can be region specific. It all tastes good though. ::laughs::

When it comes to drinks, tea is normally always sweet unless otherwise stated. Southern sweet tea can be extremely sweet so having half and half isn't that weird. All drinks that aren't steaming (coffee) are served with ice. Getting a drink without ice can be a pain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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Ugh.This only makes me more hungry. You named more things I forgot to name. Especialy sweet potato pie.

I just thought about pecan pie. I think that's mainly southern.(We have pecan trees in my grandmother's yard, so free pecans yay.)

Is boiled peanuts mainly southern? I never thought about it. I do know my relatives who moved up north used to buy the bagged unshelled peanuts when they came back down to visit because they couldn't find any where they lived.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j.l.h

I'm still trying to think of "southern" foods. I know the foods that are really common here but they are common in most of the places that I have been as well.

Wait - Gator tail. That is pretty good when cooked right.

I didn't see boiled peanuts when I lived in the midwest or when I traveled north. If they are there, it isn't like where I live now - boiled peanuts are in most little gas stations and farmers markets. What I have seen but don't see in the more metro areas are chicken gizzards at gas stations. While I am not a fan, my fiance loves them.

When I lived in the mid-west we had door to door tamale sales men. Came by every Saturday morning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianvonne
italianvonne
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And you should try fried pickles. They actually taste good. I also used to think they may taste weird being warm, but they don't. It actually works.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j.l.h

Cool. I'll try it out then.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaki.a
Elenaki.a
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We use avocado in salad (unsweetened) and salad alot. I personally like to put lemon, oil, salt & pepper on it and eat it like that - I think it's great. I don't now anyone else who does that though. I also don't know anyone who eats it with sugar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ravnin

Well, here in Norway we put bell peppers and cucumber on top of our our tacos. I've been told this is rather strange.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CuriousAtanaa

As others have said, it's hard to know what's strange elsewhere, but I understand in (at least some of?) the US it's normal to eat strawberries as part of the main meal - another thing you put in salad. Here (in the UK) we consider them to be very much a fruit. We sometimes have them on their own or with sugar if they're not sweet enough, often with cream (strawberries and cream are very traditional at Wimbledon - a tennis championship) sometimes in/on cakes and other sweat things. Never in a savory dish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoHideki6e

I love "pão de queijo"! Translating i mean that is something like bread of cheese. It is very good, i think that comes from Minas Gerais (Brazil), it is a bread with cheese inside. I don't know how to explain, outside is crunchy and inside is gummy.

3 years ago
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