"Ella entrega las llaves."

Translation:She gives the keys.

5 years ago

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SevenYearIllini

Why not use the verb dar here? Is that not appropriate? Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belladog01
belladog01
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dar=to give ,entregar= to deliver (usually)

dar is used for anything you can give, from a gift to a kiss entregar is to deliver something , like the homework to the teacher etc.

Te doy el balon= I give you this ball Te entrego el balon=I deliver this ball to you

Mostly entregar is something you HAVE to do,something from you to the other person as a very important possession, like a crown etc. It can also be simply a synonym for dar.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SevenYearIllini

Thank you for the very helpful explanation!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mloclm

Perfect. We need people like you on this list. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/burgerburglar

very helpful, Muchas Gracias.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Should "hand in" be included to the translations too? I think it's more appropriate than the "give in" which is among the given translations; give in is a verb phrase and has a different connotation altogether.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garciaefremov
garciaefremov
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Thanks, can I just ask for a little more clarification on the ball example.

Te doy el balon = I give you this ball....as a present? Te entrego el balon = I deliver this ball to you......because it's a present from someone else?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Broncos27
Broncos27
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Yo tengo que entregar muchas "props."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

This is a terrible example. Neither the Spanish sentence, nor the attempted English translation make very much sense.

A pronoun before "entrega" would make this sentence far more useful.

"Ella ME entrega las llaves" -- that's a sentence which makes sense and has a nice clean English translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

The meaning seems quite clear to me. I don't understand your problem with the sentence. Perhaps we live far enough apart from each other that we're used to slightly different sentence structures?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Wait, it just occurred to me that you may have seen a different translation. Sometimes Duolingo changes translations based on reports but the comments referring to the previous sentence remain.

EDIT After reading more comments, it is clear that the translation was changed from a strange phrase to the current, "She turns in the keys." Now I understand totally where you were coming from!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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It has "give away" as a suggestion so why not, "She gives away the keys."?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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now accepted

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caradelsol

She brings or she delivers the keys seems far more appropriate. "She gives the keys" is strange.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FelipeFresnal

In my French Spanish dictionary entregar is translated as "remettre" which I understand, just as my my French English dictionary confirms, stands for "give back" or "put back". Couldn't entregar also mean "give back" or "put back" ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luxnax
luxnax
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Shouldn't she returns the keys be alright?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KelseyJ

In addition to "to give", my dictionary has "to hand over" as a translation for entregar.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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that makes sense to give, to hand over, same thing. I used 'delivers' and got it correct

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

entregar los prisioneros - hand over the prisoners - but not keys in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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Why not? I wrote "She hands over the keys" and it was accepted. Let's say you were working somewhere and had keys to the office and you quit your job, so you hand over the keys to the employer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Yes, that would be a good example of hand over the keys - also mother to daughter: hand over those car keys!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catskul

"gives up" should be accepted here as well. Entregar is equivalent to "surrender".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DustinS.3

Agreed, it is the most common way to phrase in American English that I've used and observed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jontona

why is "llaves" pronounced like "javas"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hosscomp

It sounded like the English pronunciation of "jarez" to me. I listened about six times and still didn't connect it with llaves

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElciAmy

Im confused abou the fact that one word 'entrega' means both deliver and give. So how do i determine which to use and in which context

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traroloc

Hello, in this case "entrega" is used in a context when the subject (she) gives an object (the keys) to someone face to face. You also can say /write : "Ella da la llaves" (a little bit informal) but is almost the same than "Ella entrega las llaves" How you said, "entrega" means "deliver", "delivery" and "gives" too

  • Here are some examples for you:

  • I have to deliver these pizzas / Tengo que entregar estas pizzas

  • He received a delivery from Mexico / El recibió una entrega desde México.

When you mean a face to face delivery you could use "dar" or "entrega" (formal). When you mean a long distance delivery, you can use "entrega"

If you have some question or doubt just write me in my activity and sorry if I am not able to explain myself correctly.

Greetings from Venezuela.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Traroloc, ¡hola! I think you did well! I did mess up the sentence, thinking about a girl bringing someone an extra set of keys because they had locked themselves out of their car. I do think of brings and delivers as synonyms, like when I order a pizza, but Duo-owl said "brings" was wrong. Oh, well. I visited your beautiful country many years ago, at a port near Caracas.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanboning
hanboning
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entrega < entregar < integro (Latin for renew, refresh), related to "integrate".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trever_Miller

"She gives the keys" has little meaning as a stand alone sentence. "She gives away the keys" makes more sense in more contexts. They should allow both answers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Based on the hover hint, I put "She gives away the keys," and the sentence was accepted as correct. My problem is that I don't believe it is always the correct translation when the translation goes from English to Spanish. Why? Because "gives away" has very specific connotations in English. When the adverb "away" follows the verb "gives," the meaning is "She is making a gift of … ." The meaning of "She gives the keys" is that she is handing the keys to someone else so the other person can open a door. We are not talking here of whether the sentence "She gives the keys" is awkward. Rather, this issue is whether she wants and/or expects to get the keys back. When I say to someone, "Give me the keys," what I usually mean is that I need to open the door and I would like that person (whose door it is) to let me open the door by borrowing his/her keys. Only rarely would the English sentence "She gives the keys" mean "She gives possession of those keys to another person." The only two examples I can think of are 1) when a parent is taking away a child's keys because the child has not been responsible, or 2) when someone is leaving a job in which he or she had been entrusted with keys. Either of these examples would need a sentence preceding it and setting up the context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

What is most important is not coming up with a refined English translation but simply understanding what a Spanish statement is saying in Spanish. And once one understands that any further association with English needs to be dropped.

Even but a very crude form of English can provide a good enough clue to gain an understanding of what the Spanish sentence means and that is all that is necessary.

Requiering absolute correct and refined English takes ones mind away from the process of learning Spanish for that's really not what one is doing in considering all the many different ways a Spanish statement can be said in English.

Our main problem is that a single Spanish verb can have many different English usages spelled out with completely different English words. What any Spanish verb means is what is common to all the many possible associated English verbs all combined. And there generally is no English word representative of that commonality. Nevertheless, we must get ahold of an understanding of it anyway and leave off thinking about all the many different associated English verbs and just consider the one Spanish verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karinagarosa
karinagarosa
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She gives the keys away -> why is that wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

She did not give the keys away, she brought them (back) to where they belong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sendero

I wrote 'brings' which was not accepted, so 'brought them back' is also wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melina.ler
melina.ler
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Brings is a different verb. Like "I bring the keys" would be "traigo las llaves"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanLaDuke

Why las, and not los?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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las= 'the' for plural feminine nouns, 'los' = 'the' for plural masculine nouns; llaves= feminine plural noun. I can't see what level you are on but this grammar is for early learners. good luck!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You can see what level a person is on by punching their name.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Just two sentences ago it said entrega meant 'deliver'. For ex. 'Él entrega las llaves'. Now it says 'She delivers the keys' is wrong and I must write 'gives'? WTF DL

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonCarr

This did not even make sense

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AshleyBlackwood

These must be the keys ella encuentra in an earlier lesson;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianbyrd123

Great sentence to know for narcos

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRodri20

Why not 'entregas' as it's plural?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lierluis
lierluis
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"Entregas" only works for "tu". Tu entregas, ella entrega

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/upstean
upstean
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it sounded like "ella enteragua las chaves"

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    whats wrong with brings!

    EditDelete3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AlmostLizbian
    AlmostLizbian
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    It sounds like "entregua" not "entrega". Is there a reason for this?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth6

    I wrote "She submits the keys", and it was marked wrong. I'm reporting it.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth6

    Yo entrego una queja. :P

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jrharshath

    She surrenders the keys??

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DustinS.3

    "She gives up the keys," does not pass.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rollermama

    She delivers the keys marked wrong 12/18/15

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/linda-lupenny

    No, I'm just trying to figure out why you keep having me do things over and over again when I've already completed the whole thing. I've completed adverbs and several other things and you keep sending me back to do them again when I've done them correctly or with one mistake? ??

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

    Are these the keys to knowledge?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/CFLORES99

    Can I say "entregame las llaves" or "entrega mis llaves" if im telling someone to give me the keys or my keys?

    2 years ago
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